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Meeting Student-Athletes' Nutritional Needs

Eating right while in college can be difficult. Junk food like pizza, burgers, and fried snacks are readily available on or near campus. Since cooking in dorms is generally prohibited, this leaves few healthy alternatives. The only vegetables in the vicinity may be found in the school’s cafeteria.

Failing to supply the body with the necessary nutrition can lead to all sorts of physical- and mental-health problems. Surviving on fast food may result in illness, fatigue, and other symptoms. College life is stressful enough without putting additional strain on the mind and body.

The situation can be worse for college athletes, who may be under even more pressure than other students. All that stress, along with the physical demands of sports, can be challenging. To stay healthy, and maximize their performance, student-athletes must be deliberate about nutrition.

Eat a Balanced Diet
You have heard it since you were a kid: “Eat your vegetables.” This is especially important for athletes. A variety of veggies, including the super-nutritious leafy ones, should be eaten every day. Fruits, whole grains, and protein are also essential. Avoid fried foods and white bread, and opt for fish instead of red meat a few times a week.

Sugar, salt, and saturated fats sap strength and energy. They also add body fat. These consequences are not only unhealthy; they can diminish an athlete’s performance on the field or court. A long-term effect of consuming large amounts of these substances may be increased vulnerability to illness and disease.

Don’t Forget Breakfast
Nutritionists emphasize the value of eating breakfast. They call it the most important meal of the day, because it replenishes the body after many hours of not eating. The hectic lives of college students require this fuel.

Breakfast is especially critical for those who play sports, as they often have morning practices or workouts. Such exertion on an empty stomach places a lot of strain on the body, which does not respond as well without food energy.

The key is to eat something in the morning, even if you oversleep and are in a hurry. At least grab a bagel and piece of fruit. Always having such ready-to-eat, nutritious items in your dorm room can save you from missing breakfast (or going to a fast-food restaurant). Ideally, the morning meal should include protein (from meat, eggs, and beans) and whole grains, as well as fruit.

Get Enough Protein
Many believe that physically active people should eat a lot of meat and other protein-rich foods. While protein is vital, overdoing it can be counterproductive. Too much protein may result in increased body fat, a loss of calcium, and dehydration. These conditions are particularly undesirable for athletes, who require toned muscles, strong bones, and well-hydrated systems.

The richest sources of protein are fish, beef, pork, and poultry. Dairy is another option. Eggs, as well as the whey protein in milk, are highly recommended. Other foods containing protein are beans, soy, quinoa, nuts, seeds, and whole grains. The best advice is to get protein from a variety of foods.

Consume Carbohydrates
Those seeking to shed pounds know they need to cut back on carbohydrates, which cause weight gain. However, avoiding carbs can be dangerous because they supply the body with the energy it needs to function properly. Athletes who neglect carbohydrates quickly become tired, and lose strength and endurance.

Carbohydrates are stored in the muscles, in the form of glycogen. The body converts glycogen into glucose (sugar), which boosts energy. Experts say that, for most people, the amount of glycogen the body can hold is enough for a 90-minute workout. Those who play sports, which usually last longer than that, are advised to load up on carbs for several days before the big game. This is really crucial for long-distance runners and bicyclists, swimmers, cross-country skiers, endurance athletes, and others whose activities are not only lengthy but also entail extreme physical exertion.

Candy, soda pop, and other sweets contain a lot of carbohydrates. However, they are considered “bad” carbs because they lack the vitamins and minerals found in “good” (complex) carbs. Whole-grain breads, cereals, and pastas (as well as vegetables, fruits, and brown rice) are examples of foods with good carbs.

Experts advise most people to ensure that carbohydrates make up a little more than half of their total food consumption. Athletes may want to increase the percentage somewhat, without getting too carried away. Diets consisting of 70 percent carbs are recommended for endurance athletes and others whose sports involve long, strenuous exercise.

Eat foods rich in carbohydrates before, during, and after intense physical activities. A small, high-carb meal an hour before a game or workout is advised. Pack a whole-grain muffin, sports bar, or fruit juice to refuel during a sports activity. Replenish the body afterword with a high-carb snack.

Drink Plenty of Water
Athletes must keep hydrated. They should drink water, sports drinks, or fruit juice before, during, and after exercising. Moisture lost via perspiration needs to be replaced, or the body will overheat and eventually break down.

Two cups of water before an activity, and at least one-half cup every 15-20 minutes while exercising, are recommended. Some authorities suggest starting with water, then switching to sports drinks because they contain electrolytes.
Keep drinking through a game or match, even when you don’t feel particularly thirsty. Keep an eye on your urine. If it is darker than normal, that could indicate dehydration. Fatigue, dizziness, and upset stomach are other possible signs that you need more water.

Supplement Your Diet
Student-athletes put so much stress on their bodies that they might find it difficult to get sufficient nutrition from food. Dietary supplements can help. Start with a multivitamin that contains not only Vitamins A through D, but also thiamin, riboflavin, and niacin. The body uses these substances to convert food into the energy that physically active people need. Look for a multivitamin that also features calcium, iron, and potassium. These nutrients are rapidly diminished while playing sports.

Many other kinds of supplements are also available. Omega-3 oils, found naturally in fish, help to regulate inflammation and blood-sugar levels. Athletes need to get enough magnesium, which strengthens muscles and regulates heart rhythm.

For student-athletes, there are multiple reasons to adopt healthy diets. Without the necessary nutrition, their ability to succeed in sports is hampered. More importantly, their overall health suffers. To maintain strength and energy, it is critical that physically active students take nutrition seriously.

Relieving Stress with Massage Therapy

Graduating from high school and beginning a post-secondary education is an important and exciting time in a young person’s life. College can be a lot of fun, but it also is a hectic experience.

Students are under pressure to succeed in their studies and form new relationships. They also face the challenge of living on their own, perhaps for the first time. This involves buying groceries, washing clothes, and performing other tasks that used to be done for them. The stress that can result must be managed to avoid physical and psychological problems. Eating nutritious food and exercising are key to keeping the body working properly and maintaining mental health.

Another way to find relief when pressures mount is to get a massage. This kind of hands-on therapy is an ancient method of relieving muscle tension, reducing pain, and promoting physical rehabilitation. The word “massage” comes from a French term for the “friction of kneading.” Numerous techniques have been developed for muscles, joints, tendons, ligaments, and fascia. Massage also is used to relieve symptoms in the vessels of the lymphatic and gastrointestinal systems.

People receiving massages typically lie on a table or sit in a chair, though beds and floor mats are sometimes used. Practitioners employ their hands, elbows, forearms, knees, and feet to apply pressure to targeted parts of the body. They improve their clients’ mobility and help them regain other physical functions.

People of all ages benefit from these treatments. They include those recovering from injuries and patients undergoing post-operative care. Others who have found massage worthwhile are people with cancer, heart disease, psychological afflictions, and disorders of the immune-response and endocrine systems.

Massage is frequently incorporated in conditioning regimens for athletes and others whose activities can result in strained muscles and injuries. Treatments can be useful for people who strain their shoulders and necks while working on computers, and those with physical problems resulting from repetitive motion.

Basic Massage
The most common type of this therapy is Swedish massage. It involves the use of the hands to work on various parts of the body to relax muscles and loosen joints. This can be as simple as rubbing a sore muscle, which a person may be able to self-administer. However, professionals are trained to target the source of discomfort and apply the most effective techniques.

There main kinds of Swedish massage are effleurage, featuring stroking movements on the affected area; petrissage, the grabbing and pulling of muscles; friction, the use of fingers in a circular motion to apply pressure; tapotement, involving chopping and tapping; and vibrasion, in which fingers are firmly pressed on muscles while the client’s body is shaken.

Deep-Tissue Work
While Swedish massage is most effective in relaxing the outer two layers of muscles, a more intensive method called deep-tissue massage is needed to provide relief in muscles that lie deeper in the body. This is often required by those whose pain results from athletics or other heavy physical activity.

Deep-tissue massage involves slowly stroking across the grain of the muscles. Elbows, as well as hands, are sometimes used to apply the necessary pressure. Therapists trained in this type of massage know how to locate individual muscles from which a person’s pain or tightness originates.

The goal is to zero in on “trigger points,” knots that radiate pain to other parts of the body. This neuromuscular technique improves blood flow, while relieving discomfort by decreasing pressure on the nerves.

Acupressure
Acupuncture, the therapeutic application of needles in the skin, has used by healers in China for thousands of years. Acupressure involves the same trigger points, which practitioners identify as the source of patients’ pain or stiffness. Hands, elbows, and tools like balls and rollers are used to apply pressure.

In addition to relieving pain, acupressure can lessen the nausea experienced by post-operative patients. It is widely believed that acupressure and acupuncture re-balance a person’s chi, a term relating to the flow of energy throughout the body.

Reiki
Another hands-on healing technique, reiki, is based on a similar idea. The term is translated as “universal life energy.” In this ancient Japanese ritual, energy is said to pass through the hands of the therapist to the patient.

While generally provided in private practices and clinics, reiki also has been used in hospitals to help surgical patients and those receiving radiation treatments. It is a deeply spiritual, as well as physical, exercise.

Rolfing
A rolfer works on myofascia, connective tissues that surround muscles. In many cases, myofascia are the source of back pain and joint aches. Patients typically develop such maladies as a result of bad posture or repetitive movements.

Rolfing is an intense therapy, which can be painful because of the amount of pressure applied with hands and elbows. People seek out rolfers when other, less extreme, massage techniques have failed to provide relief.

Patients undergoing hellerwork receive rolfing massage, as well as an education in improving their postures to reduce the damage to joints and muscles. The straightening, stretching, and massaging featured in hellerwork sometimes results in patients “growing” as much as an inch in height.

The multiple forms of massage range from gentle stroking to painful pressure. These therapies can be emotional, as well as physical, experiences. Patients have been known to weep upon getting a measure of relief from their pain. This is considered normal, and experts advise not resisting the impulse to cry.

The technique that works best for one person may be different than that needed by another. It is important to find a practitioner who can provide the most effective method of massage for an individual complaint.

Students who get an occasional massage may find that they feel more relaxed, mentally and physically. Many have found that these healing techniques make it easier to deal with the stress of the college experience.

7 Deadly Freshman Sins to Avoid

Being a college freshman is such a new experience that it is easy to make mistakes. Most people accept this as a natural part of adjusting to college life. In reality, if you are aware of some of the mistakes, you can avoid them. Some students who start college on the wrong foot never completely recover. This can lead to poor grades and eventually failing the course. Here are seven of the most common mistakes that college freshmen make:

  1. Taking on too many courses: Some new students mistakenly think that the more credits they have, the better. This is an easy way to fail in your first year. You should understand that college courses are more complex than high school courses. Start with those that match your career goals, and then add extra credits once you know how to manage your course workload.
  2. Thinking college is like high school: This is more common than you think. Many freshmen are simply not prepared for the workload and the kind of discipline that college requires. Not being prepared for the changes of college, lead many freshmen to fail as they find it difficult to change their study habits and they end up with poor grades.
  3. Partying too much: Socializing is important, but doing it too often can affect your grades. It is important to strike a balance between your work and your social life. For some students it might be better to skip parties and similar events for the first few months. This will give you time to get used to your schoolwork schedule so that you can better schedule time to hang out with friends.
  4. Choosing the wrong courses: Some new college students feel a lot of pressure to decide on a career right away. This can cause them to pick courses that are not right for them, and they will end up performing poorly.
  5. Communication problems: Some college students feel intimidated by their professors and this can cause serious communication problems. If these students have a problem understanding the course material or something the lecturer said, they are afraid to speak up. This can cause them to fall behind in class. Remember that most professors are always willing to talk to their students to help them learn.
  6. Not relaxing enough: While some students party too much, some spend too much time studying and working without taking time to relax. It is important to take a break from studying to relax and spend time with friends. You can also join groups on campus that help you meet new people. Volunteering is another good way to find time to unwind.
  7. Spending too much time working: If you have to work while attending college, you will need to must create a balance between your schoolwork and job. Failing to create this balance will result in one suffering.

Avoiding these mistakes will not happen overnight, but it is important thing not to take too much time to make changes. Otherwise, you could find yourself stuck in the same situation for a long time. Make use of technology as much as possible to help you to stay on top of your courses. Any freshman can have a great first year in college with some planning.

How to Make the Most of Orientation Week

Orientation week is that first week in the college year where freshmen will learn about what their colleges have to offer. You need to take advantage of your school’s orientation week if you want to get the most out of your college experience. There are many good things you can do to get more from this special period of time so you can enjoy your life while on campus.

Look Around the Area

It helps to take a look around the campus to see what’s available for you. Check out the libraries, gymnasiums and other places that offer some good things for you to take advantage of.

Take a look at the areas right outside the campus as well. You might be amazed at the variety of supermarkets, restaurants and other recreational features that are available in your area. Don’t forget to see what transportation services are available in your area so you’ll have an easier time getting to and from different places.

Establish a Good Community

The odds are you’ll find plenty of good people who are outside your housing unit or classes. Feel free to talk with other people and see if you can create a community between yourself and others in the area.

Look for any social gatherings or meetup events that are scheduled during your orientation week. You might be surprised at the variety of such events that are available for you to take advantage of.

Look For Student Clubs

There are many great student clubs out there that offer all sorts of activities for students that have particular interests. You can always join such clubs to meet people who hold interests that are similar to what you have. The best part of this is that you could even start your own club although you might have to get in touch with a student life group to see what you can do about starting up such a club of interest to you and others.

See What Major Events Are Happening

Many orientation week activities will entail many major events that will go on around campus. In some cases they can involve concerts or special parties. Depending on where you go, there might be a big football game where you are at. Feel free to attend major events in your area so you’ll have access to some great things that are coming about in your area.

Be Ready For Anything

The best thing you can do during your orientation week is to just be ready for whatever might come about. You might be amazed at some of the things you can experience while on campus. The key is that you need to watch for how unique life on campus can be.

While on campus, you will be exposed to many different cultures and ideas outside of your comfort zone. Don’t be afraid to get out of that zone.

You should certainly be excited over what you are getting into when moving onto campus. Be sure to look at what’s available during the orientation week on campus so you’ll have plenty of fun and even find just who you really are while you are there.

6 Tips on Packing for College

The big day is finally about to arrive. You are leaving home and heading off to college. You cannot take everything with you, because your new living space will be much smaller than your family home. The challenge is to pack everything you really need, and determine which items to leave behind. Here are some tips to consider when packing for college.

1. Gather Information
Before compiling a packing list, have a good understanding of the amount of space your dorm room provides. Check the size of the beds, so you know which sheets are required. Note the amount of closet space, and the size of the bathroom and kitchen area. Measure door widths and other narrow spaces to make sure your furniture is not too large to get into the room.

Read the policies of the college or university to learn whether any items are not allowed in the dorms. Most schools prohibit cooking, or using any device that could start a fire. Inquire whether the college provides moving services for incoming students.

Communicate with your roommate. Tell each other if you have any allergies. Coordinate on large items, because you probably don’t need two entertainment systems or a pair of couches in your room. This process becomes more complicated if more than two roommates are involved.

2. Clothing
The amount of clothing you pack depends partly on the size of your new closet and bedroom. You might be faced with some difficult decisions.

You are probably moving in the fall, so you won’t need most of your summer clothes for a while. You can get them when you go home for the holidays or during spring break. Remember that you can always buy clothes on or near near campus. You might find that you want to change your style. Save money by checking out second-hand clothing stores.

It has been recommended that you pack sufficient clothing to last a week. You probably don’t want to have to do laundry more often than that. Think in terms of having seven days’ worth of tops, bottoms, underwear, and socks.

You want school clothes, casual wear, and perhaps a formal outfit. Depending upon the activities you enjoy, pack a swimsuit, jogging gear, or other sports clothing. Don’t forget hats and footwear. Good shoes are important; you are going to be doing a lot of walking around campus, which is no fun on sore feet.

You likely will be doing your own laundry. For this chore, you will require powdered or liquid soap, a laundry basket, and maybe other stuff like bleach or dryer sheets. Roommates can share irons and ironing boards.

3. Bedroom and Bathroom Items
Pack pillows, including your favorite one, with extra pillowcases. You also might want two sets of sheets, a light blanket and a heavier cover, a mattress pad, and a mattress cover. Pack an alarm clock, a reading light, and perhaps a small television or DVD player for the bedroom. Don’t forget sleep clothes and slippers.

If you have inspected your dorm, you know the size of the bathroom. There may not be enough space there, and in your bedroom, for all the personal-care items you are accustomed to having. Take a hard look at what you really need for grooming and bathing. You can always buy things after the move. Your list may include a hair dryer, brush and comb, toothbrush and toothpaste, hair products, towels and washcloths, shaving materials, and toiletries.

4. Kitchen Items
When it comes to packing for the eating or cooking area of the dorm, coordination with roommates is vital. Otherwise, you could find yourselves with two microwaves and multiple refrigerators. Of course, you must first know what is provided in the room. There may already be a refrigerator.

Pack two forks, a large and small spoon, a butter knife and a cutting knife, two dinner plates and a pair of smaller plates, glasses and cups, water bottles, and bowls. If cooking is permitted and you use a microwave, take the appropriate cookware. You will need dish soap, dish towels, trash bags, a coffee pot and filters, pot holders, paper towels, food-storage containers, and plastic baggies.

5. Shared Space
Roommates need to discuss the sorts of furnishings and decorative items they want in their shared living space. Couches, chairs, coffee tables, and end tables are among the furniture options. Reach agreement on lighting and other issues. Consider a message board to hang on the wall.

This is your new home, so surround yourself with familiar items like photos and high school mementos. But make sure your roomy is OK with that picture or poster you want to put up on the living room wall.

6. Study Area
Whether it is in your bedroom or a in a corner of the shared living space, you need a quiet place to study. A comfortable chair that provides proper support, good lighting, and a large desk or table are recommended. You need space for your computer, books, and other school items.

As much as possible, you want your dorm room to feel like home. College life is stressful; your living area must be a comfortable place for you to relax. However, the limited space will force you to leave a lot things back home. Packing wisely, in conjunction with your roommates, can make the transition easier to handle.

5 Tips on How to Select College Classes

The transition from high school to college entails major changes in a student’s life. Many important decisions need to be made. One of the most critical tasks is to decide which courses to include in your class schedule. A number of factors should be considered when making your selections.

Beyond the general-education requirements, there is a wide array of options that may seem overwhelming at first. The list can be reduced quickly if you know what you need. Here are five tips for picking college classes.

1. Get Some Help
Filling out a class schedule, especially in your freshman year, can be daunting. You are making decisions that will affect your academic future. Advisers are available at colleges and universities to provide assistance.

These counselors help students pick courses, determine the semester-hour load they can handle, and craft their class schedules. You may want to take the bulk of your courses on certain days of the week, or spread them out. You could be a morning person, or one who is more alert in the afternoon or evening. You might have a part-time job that determines when you are available for classes.

Advisers can help you deal with other aspects of college life, as well. Take advantage of this resource.

2. Check Out Classes and Professors
You cannot find out everything about a course simply by reading about it. Visiting classrooms during the early days of your first semester can help you make decisions. If you sit in on a class that you wish you had selected, it may not be too late to add it to your schedule. You also can consider taking it the following semester. Some universities encourage this so-called “course shopping.”

Learn about the people teaching the classes. Reviews and ratings of professors at major universities are available from several online sources. You also can talk with fellow students on campus who have taken classes with professors you are considering. Beware of a small sample size, as negative comments by one or two students do not necessarily provide an accurate picture.

3. Determine the Core Requirements
General-education classes that are mandated for all students are called core requirements. Colleges and universities differ in the policies, but most require successful completion of courses in the categories of science, math, language arts and social studies. Make sure you know all the classes from which to choose, in each category. Select “introduction to” courses, and those that best relate to the major you anticipate pursuing.

Many students want to get these requirements out of the way, to clear their schedule in later semesters for upper-level classes and other academic offerings more suited to their majors. However, if you are not sure which major to pursue, you may want to defer some of the general-education classes. When your major becomes clear, you will know which of the class alternatives within the core requirements are appropriate.

Do not take many electives during your freshman and sophomore years. These courses may not be relevant for the major you wind up pursuing. On the other hand, college is an opportunity to study topics that interest you. Find a balance in these concerns.

4. Choose Varied Courses
Students change their majors often during their college years. Freshmen are the least likely to know for sure the type of degree they will end up earning. By putting together a varied class schedule, you have a better chance of covering your academic bases. This method will expose you to more subjects, expanding your ideas for future classes.

Make sure to take some classes that involve writing, as this is a required skill in most degree programs. You need to be able to compose essays, and present yourself in a professional manner to prospective employers.

5. Focus on Your Degree
Learn early on which courses are required to qualify for the degree you are seeking. While you won’t have to worry about most of these classes during your first couple of years, you must have a plan.

If you feel certain about the major you want, begin taking some upper-level courses even as you are completing the core requirements. Some of the classes you need for your degree may fill quickly, or not be offered each semester. You don’t want to find out during your senior year that you have failed to take a required course.

By following these steps, you can help ensure that the classes you select meet your needs. Picking the right courses, at the appropriate time, is just part of the challenge. You also must create a workload you can sustain, and have a class schedule that fits with the rest of your life. Making your selections wisely can help you reach your goals.

Zayed University

The stunningly picturesque city of Abu Dhabi, with its blend of classic Islamic architecture and modern corporate skyscrapers, was built on an island in the Arabian Gulf. Abu Dhabi also is the name of the region, one of seven that make up the federation known as the United Arab Emirates.

Eighty percent of the population of the city, which is the capital of the UAE, consists of non-natives. They represent more than 150 nationalities. English is considered the second language in Abu Dhabi, which has street signs in Arabic and English. The lack of a language barrier eases the transition for incoming students at the emirate’s universities and other postsecondary schools.

Abu Dhabi boasts more than a dozen such institutions. Some are based in the UAE, while others are foreign campuses of universities in Europe, the Americas, and elsewhere. They include public and private schools, which offer a wide range of undergraduate and master’s degree programs.

UAEU
The oldest and most prestigious postsecondary institution is United Arab Emirates University in the city of Al Ain. According to the QS World Rankings, it is the top university in the UAE. Founded in 1976, it has become the country’s premier teaching and research institution.

More than 14,000 students from the emirate and around the world attend UAEU, which awards bachelor’s, master’s, and doctorate degrees. At last report, women comprised more than three-quarters of the student body. Colleges include business and economics, education, engineering, food and agricuture, humanities and social sciences, information technology, law, medicine and health sciences, and health. UAEU is rated the second-best research university in the Arab world. Students and faculty study issues ranging from cancer treatment to water resources.

Abu Dhabi University
At Abu Dhabi University, undergraduate and graduate programs focus on the English language, arts and sciences, business administration, and engineering and computer science. This private university, established in 2003, had 4,311 undergrads and 145 staff members in 2013. Its main site is an Al Ain, with a newer campus (opened in 2006) in Khalifa City.

KUSTAR
Khalifa University of Science, Technology, and Research was established in the city of Abu Dhabi in 2007. It evolved from the Etisalat College of Engineering, founded in 1989 in Sharjah. Etisalat is the name of a telecommunications company that needed trained employees. The co-educational university’s 1,300 students represent more than 40 nations. The College of Engineering offers nine undergraduate degrees, five postgraduate programs, and five fields of PhD specialization.

Higher Colleges of Technology
With more than 18,000 students in 2013, the Higher Colleges of Technology was among the country’s largest postsecondary institutions. It was founded in 1988, as a public school. HCT operates 17 campuses in various locations (including the cities of Abu Dhabi and Al Ain) in the UAE. Separate facilities are provided for male and female students. The university has colleges of business, communications, computer and information science, education, engineering technology, and health science. Some of the programs, including bachelor of education, are internationally accredited. The 934 faculty members, who come from throughout the world, teach courses in English.

PSUAD
Paris-Sorbonne University is one of the most renowned postsecondary schools in the world. Its campus on Al Reem Island in Abu Dhabi provides the same humanities and social-sciences curricula as those offered in France. Some of the professors are even the same, as they often travel between France and the UAE. The university also has programs in law and political science, as well as a one-year French class. PSUAD degrees are recognized everywhere. About 500 students from 60 countries live in single dorm rooms, with separate housing blocks for men and women. According to its website, the university provides “world-class” education, and functions as a “centre for research and cultural activities.” The school’s huge library features books in six languages.

Al Ain University
In the city of the same name, Al Ain University of Science and Technology was founded in 2004. Students from more than 20 countries receive instruction in the English language, in addition to their chosen fields of study. The school has accredited programs in business administration, education, engineering, information technology, law, and pharmacy. Thirteen undergraduate degrees and 10 graduate programs are available at this co-educational institution.

ALHOSN University
Established in 2005 in the city of Abu Dhabi, ALHOSN University consists of three colleges. They provide degree programs in education, English, social science, accounting, business administration, management information systems, architecture, civil engineering, interior design, mathematics and natural sciences, mechanical and industrial engineering, software engineering, and urban planning.

Masdar Institute
A graduate school and research facility in Masdar City, the Masdar Institute of Science and Technology enrolled 417 students in 2013. Only 162 of them were from the UAE. More than 80 faculty members provide an impressive student-teacher ratio of 5:1. Bachelor’s and master’s degrees in various scientific fields, as well as a doctorate in interdisciplinary engineering, are available. At last report, faculty and students were conducting more than 300 research projects. They concerned issues like alternative energy, sustainability, and the environment. The school opened in 2009.

New York Institute of Technology
Founded in the United States in 1955, the New York Institute of Technology is a private institution with campuses in North America, China, and the Middle East. It features a College of Arts and Sciences, as well as a College of Osteopathic Medicine. There are also schools of architecture and design, education, engineering and computing sciences, health professions, and management. NYIT offers more than 50 degree options for undergraduates, and a similar number of graduate programs.

New York University Abu Dhabi
Downtown Abu Dhabi and Saadiyat Island are the sites of campuses operated by New York University. The school’s Center for Science and Engineering, a research and laboratory facility, is 12 miles outside the capital city. NYU has five academic divisions in Abu Dhabi: arts and humanities, engineering, science, social science, and multidisciplinary. Students choose from among 22 undergraduate majors. Graduate programs are provided in biology, chemistry, and engineering.

Zayed University
Named for the founder of the UAE, Zayed University was established in 1998 and became accredited 10 years later. It has three campuses, including one in Abu Dhabi, where classes are taught in English. The government-sponsored school accepts more than 7,000 male and female students annually. In recent years, they have represented about 20 countries. Zayed awards bachelor’s degrees in arts and sciences, business, education, information technology, and media. Master’s programs include business administration, health-care management, diplomacy and international affairs, and museum studies. Foreign students learn Arabic while pursuing their degrees.

In addition, Abu Dhabi has two business colleges (INSEAD and the University of Strathclyde Business School), a branch of The Petroleum Institute, and the Emirates College for Advanced Education.

The faculty and staff at Abu Dhabi’s higher-education institutions come from 50 countries. Such diversity matches that of the cosmopolitan city. International students find that the emirate not only offers quality postsecondary education. It also is an interesting place to live for a few years.

Among the options for off-campus activities are hanging out at the Corniche, a favorite waterfront area; going to public beaches on the Arabian Gulf coast, where boating and water-sports opportunities are available; and shopping and dining in the city. Festivals and fairs featuring art, music, and film take place annually. Students get around in taxis or leased cars, as there is no public transportation in the monarchy.

International students who have been accepted by a university in the UAE are required to obtain student residence visas from the government. Educational institutions assist their students in securing these documents, which must be renewed each year. To qualify, students have to be enrolled full time and earn passing grades. They also are asked to prove their financial ability to pay for their studies.

All You Need to Know About The “Freshman 15” Syndrome

You might have heard of the “Freshman 15” syndrome. Most people are known to experience it during the first year of their college. Are you prepared for it?

What is the “Freshman 15” Syndrome?

Most people are observed to gain about fifteen pounds of weight during the first year of their college education owing to their eating habits. It may occur due to the sudden exposure to buffet-styled meals or the personal choice of trying out different junk and fattening cuisines. Nevertheless, the freshman 15 is one of the most dreaded aspects of getting into college.

Some people may experience an advanced version of “Freshman 15” – characterized by gaining more than fifteen pounds of weight. At this stage, the need to employ an effective remedy is highly stressed. On the other hand, those experiencing the lower side of this syndrome – gaining less than fifteen pounds of weight – are at a risk to progress to the advanced level unless an effective counter strategy is employed!

Why “Freshman 15”?

Different colleges have different meal options. Some may offer buffet-styled meals with multiple choices and virtually an endless reserve of food. This promotes binge eating on a frequent basis. You may overeat while making an attempt to try all delicacies – the combined effect of which is seen as fifteen pounds at the end of the year!

Another reason for this weight gain could be the nonexistence of a personal kitchen and/or caretaker. Since you cannot prepare your own food, you are left with no option but to depend on foods prepared by restaurants and/or other food outlets. The foods produced at such places are more often junk containing an alarmingly high amount of unnecessary fats and devoid of other important nutrients. Consequently, when you consume such foods, you tend to end up with fifteen additional pounds of weight you never volunteered for!

Battling the “Freshman 15” Syndrome!

There are a number of ways you can keep your diet under control and ensure you are getting the right foods in the right quantities. However, this usually requires you to make an additional effort. Unless you are willing to go out of your way in order to eat healthy, there is nothing in the world that can help you avoid the fifteen (or maybe twenty) pounds of additional weight!

Here are a few ideas to help you maintain your health while on campus.

  • Analyze your food options critically: You need to bring out the detective in you and analyze everything that you consume. Evaluate whether it is good for your health or not before putting it in your mouth. Only then will you be able to avoid unhealthy options.
  • Regularize your meal times: Make sure you consume a healthy breakfast before entering your classes. Also, keep a specific time for your lunch and dinner. This will help you in battling hunger and therefore bad food choices.
  • Research: Conduct your own research on what is good for your health and what is not. If there is something falling in the shady area between health and illness, login to your computer and search about its nutritional value. You can do so for all foods that you consume. You will automatically find out which foods you should avoid and which ones contribute towards your health!
  • Seek Help! Most colleges have nutrition centers and nutritional experts that can help you regulate your food intake. Do not hesitate to approach them if you find yourself indecisive about your food choices. With their effort and your own dedication, you will be able to get your life onto a nutritious track. So you can keep off the weight and enjoy a fulfilling tenure on campus!

4 Steps to Planning a Career When Studying Abroad

Career planning is an often-neglected aspect when students are looking up top universities abroad, or in their locality. Properly deciding on a career path, and hence selecting the right universities that could bolster your chances of success is crucial to your long-term success in life. The following is a four-step method of finding the right career path for you:

  1. Knowing Yourself
  2. Exploring Careers
  3. Short listing Decisions
  4. Taking Action

Step 1: Knowing Yourself
On a piece of paper, draw two parallel lines across the page, dividing it in two. Next, further divide it into three equal portions such that the paper has 6 boxes. Mark them as “past”, “Where I am now”, “Where I want to be”. Start working on where you want to be based on your passions and your dreams. Ask questions such as:

  • Where do I want to be?
  • What do I want out of a job or career?
  • What do I like to do?

Write short answers to these questions above the line. Next move to the current “where I am now” and answer the following:

  • Where am I at now?
  • What are my strengths?
  • What is important to me?

Using these answers, you can easily search for various occupations and find the skill sets that they demand, or look for, in their employees. This will greatly help you select the right universities and university programs to build those skills.

Step 2: Exploring Careers
This step is about exploring the occupations and learning areas that interest you, and which you have stated in the previous step. The occupational preferences that you have gained from the research will tell you the required skills you have to work for now. Ask the following questions:

  • Where do I lack?
  • What skills do I need?
  • Where is the work?
  • Do my current academic and financial options limit my choices of universities?

At the end of this you will have a clear idea of the skills that you have to focus, the specific university options that you should be looking for (types of scholarships etc).

Step 3: Short Listing Decisions
This step involves comparing your options and narrowing down your choices. Ask the following questions:

  • What are my best work/training options?
  • Are they realistic: How do they fit with the current market?
  • What will help and what will hinder me? Moreover, what can I do about it?

This step will give you a laser view of the options you should focus on and have more of an idea of what you need to do next to help you achieve your goals.

Step 4: Taking Action
By now you will have researched about different facets, so ask yourself:

  • What actions/steps do I need to take, do I need professional assistance?
  • From where can I get help?
  • Who will be able to support me?

Now, compile all the work into a comprehensive plan. Then check out the top undergraduate universities on www.scoolist.com

5 Tips For Finding Scholarships

A college education can cost tens of thousands of dollars to attain. The struggles that may come with student loans can especially become a burden to your life. Therefore, you have to find financial aid in order to help you keep the cost down. The best way to do this is through a scholarship.

Scholarships are given to all sorts of students who meet particular qualifications. These will cover a sizeable part of the cost of an education. They are also given out to a variety of students for various purposes that vary by each option available.

The odds are there is a scholarship out there right now that you can qualify for. However, you must find such a scholarship to make it work for you. There are many great tips to follow when it comes to finding scholarships that you can qualify for.

Start Early

You have to start looking for scholarships as early as possible. It is easier to find scholarships when you do it earlier as that means you won’t have to worry about too many of them being taken.

This is especially ideal if you are about to go to college. Starting your search for scholarships before your senior year of high school is always a good idea as it gives you time to find what you are looking for.

Check Local Groups

You should look to see what local groups in your area have to offer when finding scholarships. Many local groups like churches, civic groups, business unions and even local banks may offer scholarships to people in your area. You might have an easier time finding a scholarship from a local entity than anywhere else, what with the competition for those scholarships being substantially less than what you might find elsewhere.

Look At the Requirements

There are various requirements that deserve to be seen when it comes to finding scholarships. Some might be based on the field of study you are in or the GPA you hold. Others might be focused on people who engage in community service activities. Others can focus on people who hold certain hobbies. The requirements for a scholarship will vary so make sure you look at them and see if you qualify for them.

Check Online Regularly

There are always new scholarships being posted online every day. These include many scholarships that are easy to search through on many databases. Be advised that many of these scholarships are available throughout the country but it never hurts to get your name in for consideration for one of them.

Put In Enough Effort

The last tip is to always put in a strong effort when trying to get a scholarship. You might feel down at times in the event that you cannot get the scholarships that you want. However, that does not mean you should give up. Put in a strong effort no matter how many times you are turned down for scholarships. Remember, there are so many options out there that there is certainly one out of that can be of benefit to you and your studies.

Scholarships can be rather easy to find if you simply know what to look for. Make sure you get out there to take a careful look at the different scholarships that are available for your use as you might be surprised at the options that you could potentially qualify for.

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