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4 Steps to Planning a Career When Studying Abroad

Career planning is an often-neglected aspect when students are looking up top universities abroad, or in their locality. Properly deciding on a career path, and hence selecting the right universities that could bolster your chances of success is crucial to your long-term success in life. The following is a four-step method of finding the right career path for you:

  1. Knowing Yourself
  2. Exploring Careers
  3. Short listing Decisions
  4. Taking Action

Step 1: Knowing Yourself
On a piece of paper, draw two parallel lines across the page, dividing it in two. Next, further divide it into three equal portions such that the paper has 6 boxes. Mark them as “past”, “Where I am now”, “Where I want to be”. Start working on where you want to be based on your passions and your dreams. Ask questions such as:

  • Where do I want to be?
  • What do I want out of a job or career?
  • What do I like to do?

Write short answers to these questions above the line. Next move to the current “where I am now” and answer the following:

  • Where am I at now?
  • What are my strengths?
  • What is important to me?

Using these answers, you can easily search for various occupations and find the skill sets that they demand, or look for, in their employees. This will greatly help you select the right universities and university programs to build those skills.

Step 2: Exploring Careers
This step is about exploring the occupations and learning areas that interest you, and which you have stated in the previous step. The occupational preferences that you have gained from the research will tell you the required skills you have to work for now. Ask the following questions:

  • Where do I lack?
  • What skills do I need?
  • Where is the work?
  • Do my current academic and financial options limit my choices of universities?

At the end of this you will have a clear idea of the skills that you have to focus, the specific university options that you should be looking for (types of scholarships etc).

Step 3: Short Listing Decisions
This step involves comparing your options and narrowing down your choices. Ask the following questions:

  • What are my best work/training options?
  • Are they realistic: How do they fit with the current market?
  • What will help and what will hinder me? Moreover, what can I do about it?

This step will give you a laser view of the options you should focus on and have more of an idea of what you need to do next to help you achieve your goals.

Step 4: Taking Action
By now you will have researched about different facets, so ask yourself:

  • What actions/steps do I need to take, do I need professional assistance?
  • From where can I get help?
  • Who will be able to support me?

Now, compile all the work into a comprehensive plan. Then check out the top undergraduate universities on www.scoolist.com

6 Tips to Nail That Internship Interview

Finding an internship that you want to take part in is easy to do when compared with completing the interview for it. You’ve got to ace your internship interview if you even want to be considered for the internship that you are interested in. You can certainly use a number of pointers to make your interview work out right. It is all so you can get the internship you’ve always wanted.

Summarize Yourself In A Few Seconds

The odds are your interviewer is going to ask you to say a few words about yourself. The interviewer will do this to get a closer idea of who you are as a person.

Create a personal summary of yourself that you can run off in less than 60 seconds. Your summary should include details on your education, your overall background and why you are interested in the internship you are applying for.

Explain Your Desire

Your interviewer will certainly ask you about why you are interested in one’s company. The interviewer may also ask you about what you know about the industry you’re interested in. Think about your desire to work at a place and come up with a way to explain everything in simple terms. Show your knowledge of the company you’re applying for the internship with and explain that you are fully aware of how the industry works. You have to be specific if possible so your interviewer will take you seriously.

Consider Your Future

Think about your future based on the internship you’re participating in. Think about how you plan on using the skills you will learn in your internship to succeed well off in the future. Your interviewer will want to see that you are committed to whatever you are interested in and that you know what to do well off into the future.

You don’t have to be too far off into the future when doing this. Think about where you might see yourself five to ten years from now so you can show you have an idea of what you want to get out of life.

Research Your Company Of Interest

You should not go into your internship interview without understanding anything about what the company does. Look up as much information on the company as you can. Check on its financials and look for the most up to date information and news about the company as possible. See if there’s anything about the company that matches up with your values or beliefs.

Use the Past To Your Advantage

The resume that your interviewer reads will certainly have information on the jobs you’ve had in the past. Use the past experience you have by explaining to the interview why you’re the right candidate for the job at hand.

Manage a Good Follow-Up

One of the best tips to use is one that can be used after the interview is over. You have to arrange for a follow-up with your interviewer. You should send a thank you message by email the day after the interview. The email should be professional and should express your gratitude for the interview.

This not only shows how prompt and professional you are but also shows the interviewer your interest in the internship. It may help you get the internship by showing that you greatly care about whatever is being offered to you.

Be prepared for your big internship interview. You might be amazed at how well it will go if you use the tips listed here.

Degrees That Lead to Best Paying Jobs

Multiple factors come into play when choosing a college major. Your primary challenge is to find a degree program that will qualify you for a career doing the type of work you enjoy.

Another consideration is how much money you can expect to make in your first job. You want to be able to pay off student loans as soon as possible, and begin living the life you envision. Here is a look at the degrees that produce the highest starting salaries for graduates.

Overview
It likely comes as no surprise to any college-bound student that degree programs in science and business lead to some of the best-paying jobs. It also is commonly understood that a high salary is not among the rewards of being a teacher or social worker.

Engineering is at the top of the list. Employment in one of this discipline’s myriad specialties featured an average starting salary of $63,000 in 2013. Computer-science majors and business grads were next at $60,000 and $54,000, respectively. Beginning jobs in communications paid $43,000; math and sciences, $42,700; education, $40,000; and humanities and social sciences, $37,000.

Keep mind that these are average figures, with some positions in each field paying more than others. The statistics were compiled by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE), a nonprofit organization based in Bethlehem, Penn. It connects private companies seeking employees with career-placement offices at universities.

The NACE study, commissioned by The Associated Press, used information from the U.S. Census Bureau, the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics, and private sources like the Job Search Intelligence firm. Data was obtained from nearly 90 universities and colleges.

Engineering
The education and expertise required to be an engineer are not the only reasons that such jobs pay the most money. It is also because of the demand for engineers. Employers continue to report a shortage of qualified applicants for positions in this field.

Of the 10 college majors that lead to the highest salaries, seven involve engineering. Ranking in first place in 2013 were graduates with degrees in petroleum engineering. Their starting pay averaged $96,200. Computer engineers placed second among all graduates, at $70,300. Coming in third were chemical engineering majors, at $66,900.

Students of aerospace, aeronautical and astronautical engineering tied for the fifth-highest starting salaries. They earned an average of $63,900, the same as that paid to mechanical engineering graduates. Next on the list were those who majored in electrical, electronics and communications engineering. They got an average of $62,500. Engineering technology, at $60,900, placed eighth among all professions.

Others on the List
While engineering jobs dominated the list, the study found several other disciplines that paid extremely well. Computer science degrees netted the fourth-best starting pay ($64,100). Finishing ninth and 10th were business management information systems ($60,300) and logistics and materials management ($59,500).

The degrees that led to the lowest-paying starting salaries are those in child and family studies, $29,500; elementary education, $31,600; social work, $31,800; athletic training, $32,800; culinary arts, $35,900; horticulture, $35,000; and theology, $34,700.

Salary Trends
Students who graduated in health sciences in 2013 saw the largest spike in pay, making 9.4 percent more than in 2012 to raise the average to $50,000. Business degrees netted about about $54,000, 7.1 percent more than they did the previous year. Salaries for education graduates were up 5.1 percent to about $40,000, while those for computer-science majors rose 4.3 percent to $60,000.

Beginning jobs in engineering professions paid 4 percent more than in 2012. The smallest increase, 1.9 percent, was reported in the humanities and social sciences. Starting salaries for those careers were about $37,000 in 2013.

However, some social-science professionals are in demand. The starting pay for sociologists soared 10.8 percent in 2013. Criminal justice majors earned 8.1 percent more than in the previous year. At the other end of the scale, those with degrees in the arts made 3 percent less, averaging $35,600.

Conclusion
In general, salaries for college graduates are on the rise. NACE reported that those who received bachelor’s degrees in 2013 received an average starting salary of about $45,000, a 5.3 percent increase from the previous year.

However, the study also found that 53.6 percent of 2013 graduates either did not have a job, or were considered underemployed, as of April that year. This demonstrates the value of earning a degree in a field that needs qualified professionals.

6 Ways to Earn a Living as a Writer

Do you have a way with words? Is it easy for you to express yourself in writing? Are you a reader who enjoys how words and sentences are structured to communicate ideas? Perhaps you are the sort of student who excels at crafting essays and compositions. If writing is one of your strengths, you may want to consider a career involving those talents.

There are numerous ways to earn a living as a writer. You can go it alone, as an author or freelance writer. Or, you can work for one of the many businesses and organizations that need people who know how to use words effectively.

Becoming a Writer

If you like to read novels, poetry, nonfiction books, articles on websites, and other materials, you are already a student of writing. Being a prolific reader may be the best kind of training. By studying the works of others, you can see how words are used and ideas are organized. You can appreciate how writers create images in readers’ minds through their clever use of the language. You also will learn how writing styles vary among journalists, authors, advertising copywriters, and others.

Some people are able to get writing jobs, or work as freelancers, without having obtained formal education. However, it is common for employers to require at least a bachelor’s degree in communications, journalism, or English. Graduates of other degree programs also may qualify, and specialize in writing about the subjects with which they are familiar.

Self-Employment

More than two-thirds of those who make a living as writers work for themselves. The most glamorous type of self-employment is becoming a published author of books. Penning the “great American novel” is a dream and goal of many writers. However, this is often the culmination, rather than the start, of a writing career. Most people need to obtain significant life experience, as well as training and education in the field, to become published authors.

You can also work independently as a freelance writer. Articles and other content are needed for websites. Print newspapers and magazines pay privately employed writers by the word or piece. This work enables writers to find jobs involving subjects with which they have expertise. Writers sometimes specialize in certain areas of interest.

News Media

One of the best ways to gain experience as a writer is to submit stories to local newspapers. These publications often need someone to cover community events or rewrite news releases. You may be able to get a summer job or part-time position.

Newspapers employ full-time and part-time reporters to cover a wide range of news topics. Writers at larger papers specialize in local government, education, sports, and other fields. While some people with only high school diplomas get reporting jobs, a journalism degree is frequently required.

The highest-paid positions in a newsroom are those of editors. To become an editor, you will probably need at least a bachelor’s degree in journalism, as well as years of experience as a reporter. Copy editors are advanced proofreaders who not only correct spelling and grammar, but also make suggestions regarding writing structure and style. Large newspapers have editors in chief, who supervise city editors, news-wire editors, assignment editors, sports editors, and others.

Television and radio stations, as well as online news media, also employ reporters and editors. Like newspapers, they need professionals who are adept at writing advertising copy, as well.

Other Publishers

Books, magazines, and websites offer jobs for writers who have proven ability as editors. Copy submitted by writers needs to be proofread, corrected, and sent back for revisions. Other positions in publishing include assistant and associate editors, copywriters, dictionary editors, editorial assistants, promotional assistants, and researchers.

Nonprofit organizations produce magazines, newsletters, news releases, and public-information documents. Large groups’ national headquarters employ teams of writers and editors.

Corporations

Large businesses need a variety of written materials, internally and for public consumption. They hire writers to create trade magazines, employee manuals, newsletters, news releases, reports, and speeches. Jobs are found in communications, publications, and public relations.

Technical writers are specialists who produce instruction manuals, software documents, and other detailed materials. Advertising departments hire marketing specialists to write promotional copy. Other corporate writing jobs involve greeting cards, scripts for television shows and commercials, and advertising slogans and songs.

Government

Local, state, and federal government entities churn out legislation, reports, and other documents on a regular basis. Government positions also include speech writers, press secretaries, and technical writers.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, writing jobs employed 129,100 people nationwide in 2012. Their median salary was $55,940 per year, or $26.89 per hour. The pay varies widely, depending upon the type of writing and the employer.

The BLS predicted that the rate of job growth for writers would be just 3 percent (3,800 additional positions) between 2012 and 2022, much less than that of the average occupation. Some types of employment, like print newspapers, are declining. On the other hand, the number of writers needed online is growing. New sites, which require articles and other content, are being created all the time.

If writing is what you do best, there is a multitude of possible careers to explore. Find one that involves subject matter with which you are interested and knowledgeable. Get some experience and education, and read the works of other writers. With persistence, you will be able to find a way to put your writing talents to work.

Campus Connections For A Perfect Future

You may not think of school as a place for networking; but in reality, it’s a gold mine of potential connections. If you manage your time and studies right, these connections have the potential to help you secure your first internship, full-time job or even a future promotion. Cultivate these relationships now and you’ll have the opportunity to help others as well.

Professors

Most professors are excited when they see a student is excited. They enjoy seeing someone who has the same passion and they appreciate those who go the extra mile. If you have a class that really interests you, make an appointment to speak with that professor. What else can you learn from them? What was their career path like if they did something before teaching? Can they recommend a career path, a company or an internship to you? A professor can be an incredible mentor. He or she can also be a reference for you when you begin to apply for jobs.

Advisors

If you attend a smaller school, it can be easier to get to know your advisors. Similar to professors, advisors can serve as mentors. They may be able to recommend classes, internships or a career path based on your interests. They may have connections with alumni as well. If you build a good relationship with your advisor, they can also serve as a reference and speak to your dedication, follow through and ability to work under pressure.

Alumni

Throughout the school year, there are often opportunities to interact with alumni. Some universities have panel discussions that include alumni and others have more casual events. You may also find that alumni volunteer at the university career center. They may practice interview skills or share information about internship or job openings and career paths at their company. Visit your career center to find out if there are any opportunities to interact with alumni. Ask questions. Learn from them. But most importantly, connect with them and stay in touch. Again, let them know what you’re interested in so that you are the person they think of when they hear of an opening.

Career Fairs

Whether you’re ready to look for a job or not, career fairs are a must. Visit the companies that interest you or those in industries that align with your major. Ask the representatives about their career path and what specific skills, classes or characteristics they look for in employees. Collect business cards and ask representatives if they would mind a follow up by email. Write a simple thank you email and then make it a point to check in every 3-6 months. You may eventually be ready to tell them you’ve completed certain classes or acquired certain skills and are interested in finding out if any internship or job positions are available. Connecting in advance shows you really want to be there and you are a determined professional.

Other Students

Whether your university is large or small, you will be surrounded by students. If you have the time to get involved in a club or group for your major, that is a wonderful way to make mutually beneficial connections. These students will likely be looking for jobs in the same industry as you. They may find a job opening that doesn’t suit them, but pass the opportunity along to you so that you can apply. They may graduate or secure a job before you. If that’s the case, they can notify you about openings at their company. Many companies actually have referral programs.

Good networking is all about thinking outside of the box and the best connections are made when you are genuine. Don’t be afraid to ask questions, get to know people and express your future goals. You never know where one conversation will lead.

4 Things to Consider Before Selecting a Career

“If you love what you do , you don’t have to work a day in your life”

One of the biggest decisions you will ever make is selecting a career. This choice is likely to determine the college you attend, the degree program you enter, the kind of job you get, and the qualify of life you enjoy in the future.

There are a number of things to consider before committing yourself. You need to understand yourself, research careers that interest you, and take into account the costs and benefits of various professions.

1. Self-Analysis

Ask yourself some questions. What do you most enjoy doing? What are your strengths and abilities? What activities interest or inspire you? Are you an extrovert who likes working with people, or would you prefer a more independent job? Do you thrive under pressure, or prefer a low-stress environment?

Think about the high school subjects in which you got your best grades, the extracurricular activities in which you excelled, and hobbies that give you satisfaction. Perhaps you have had a part-time or summer job involving duties you enjoyed. These experiences should paint a fairly clear picture of what you like and the things you do well.

Students have widely varying interests, talents, and personalities. Everyone is not suited for the same types of employment. Take an honest look at yourself, and cross off your list of possible careers those that do not fit you. Ask a high school guidance counselor, teacher, or other adult you trust to rate your strengths and give you feedback on potential occupations.

A number of career-assessment tests and quizzes are available online. They measure your aptitude for various sorts of jobs, and help you identify aspects of your personality that would lend themselves to certain professions. Because your psychology plays a major role in determining what you like and dislike, some of these tests pose probing personal questions. The Career Key, the Myers-Briggs test, and the Strong Interest Inventory are among the career self-assessments you may want to consider taking.

2. Research

Look up information about jobs that match your interests, skills, and personality. Conduct web searches of words and terms related to the subjects and activities you enjoy. Find out about employment opportunities involving those things, and compile a list of careers that you find intriguing.

Research job descriptions and other information about these careers. Speak with professionals in the fields you are considering, and ask them about the joys and challenges of their jobs. Volunteer or get an internship doing work related to a career that you find interesting. The more you learn, the easier it will be to reduce the number of potential jobs on your list.

3. Costs and Rewards

It should come as no surprise that high-paying professions tend to require substantial investments of time and money. For instance, medical doctors must earn bachelor’s degrees, complete four years of medical school, and then obtain several years of specialized training before they are finally allowed to practice.

You are obviously interested in knowing how much various jobs pay. A lucrative occupation may enable you to pay off your student loans much more quickly. While everyone wants to make a good salary, the amount of money is more important to some people than it is to others. How much does it matter to you?

Keep in mind how much it costs to get the education and training required for a career. Find out which colleges and universities offer degree programs in the field. Are the schools far away, or could you save money by commuting from home?

Do not be discouraged by high tuition rates, at least not until after learning about all the financial-aid opportunities. Scholarships, grants, loans, and other types of assistance are available from the federal government, states, colleges, and private organizations. You may find that your preferred career path is not as expensive as you initially feared.

4. Job Prospects

Another factor is the number of jobs expected to be available in a profession in the future. The federal government’s Bureau of Labor Statistics is one of the sources you can consult for such predictions.

Having a degree will not mean much if you can’t find a job in the field. Learn about a career’s trends to get an idea of future job prospects. Try to figure out whether an occupation will continue to provide the salary level you require.

There are many things to keep in mind while going through the process of selecting a career. Do not forget to continually ask yourself, “Is this something I can see myself doing every day for the rest of my life?” No matter how much a job pays, you are not likely to be happy if you don’t like the nature of the work.

Finally, remember that nothing is permanent. You can always change your mind, though it could be costly to do so. Many students change their majors during their college years. Others opt for different professions after they have worked for several years in their degree field.

If you follow all the steps, compile the necessary information, and make wise decisions, you may find yourself with a career that you love.

Job-search, the term itself has become so clichéd that today even Googling it will land you up with a million search results. A zillion career experts with numerous opinions, each guaranteeing you the most desirable job offer and there you stand, stuck in a dilemma to make the best pick.

It might seem a bit rudimentary, but before putting any step forth, you need to get your basics in tune. Hence, mentioned below are a few such tools that either have been overlooked or not at all considered during your job hunt campaign so far. So, without further ado, just give them a good glance and try whatever it takes to incorporate these into your routine. Who knows, it might just click right!

Digital Tools to Brand Yourself

In this technical era, gone are those days when you had to post a copy of your resume to different companies. The corporate world today runs online and that’s where you need to make a mark. The recruiters in most of the corporations hire employees by getting their databases from search engines like Google and Bing.

You need to start by giving it a try and searching yourself on various search engines. Tools like Trackur and Google Alerts can prove quite handy in the same regard. You can view and control the quantity of information, you want to let out in front of HR professionals mapping and sourcing candidates.

In addition to this, you can also use your social media accounts and a personal blog to make your online presence more efficacious. To sum up the point, ways are numerous, it just depends on your approach and the efforts invested to boost your digital image.

Most Significant One: The Networking Hack

Sources round the globe suggest that networking is one of the most crucial tools that can benefit any job-seeker. While it’s true that vacancies are let out up for grabs amongst job-hunters, but to be truthful, chances that way are quite bleak. What you need to tap is the ‘hidden job market’. Companies in most of the countries today are going for referrals instead of walk-ins. Hence, it becomes imperative for you to collaborate with people through platforms like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. Moreover, you can also build and nurture a healthy professional network, just by being a regular participant at various networking events. Meet people, learn more about your industry and make it a regular affair to have conversations with them. As pushy as it may sound, this really works in favor of those hunting for the right internship or employment opportunity.

A Track of All Your Accomplishments

Although there’s a specific section in your resume talking about the medals you hold in the academic arena and all the accolades you’ve won during your time as a student, but is that it?

There sure are ways you can pump up the efforts and make it way more conspicuous. What todays employer looks for are success stories during the walk of your career and this is what you need to target. It proves to be quite a fruitful method, considering the fact that it gives the employer an idea regarding your capabilities and the way you react when tackling adverse situations.

For instance, being an online marketing expert you might list increasing the web-traffic up by 25% as an achievement. But, it does little for a skeptical manager. What you need is to lay down the whole story and explain, how you were up for the task and the challenges you faced while hitting the required target. This way he’ll get over every modicum of inhibition hovering above his head.

Obviously, these were things you always came across but ignored, somehow. What you need at present is the implementation of these ideas to increase the bandwidth of alternatives you may score. Good luck!

10 Health Careers That Don't Require a Medical Degree

The booming health-care industry is expected to continue growing at a rate far exceeding that of most other fields in the coming decade. A growing population, especially the rising number of seniors, is creating additional demand for the services of many kinds of medical providers.

Students interested in a career in health care may find the educational requirements daunting. Surgeons and other doctors, as well as some other medical professionals, must complete four years of undergraduate studies, resulting in a bachelor’s degree in a life science; four years of medical school; and several more years of internships and residencies. The academic challenges posed by this lengthy process, not to mention the high cost of graduate study, are prohibitive for many students.

Fortunately, there are health-care occupations that do not entail such an intense commitment. To get some of these jobs, all that is needed is a certificate. For others, a two-year associate’s degree or four-year bachelor’s degree is sufficient. High school students planning to enter medical careers are advised to take science and math classes like biology, chemistry, physics, and algebra.

Here is a look at just 10 of the numerous health careers that do not require medical degrees.

Cardiovascular Technologists
These professionals perform diagnostic tests to detect illnesses, diseases, and disorders of the heart, blood vesssels, and lungs. Procedures in which they are trained include ultrasound, pulmonary-function and lung-capacity tests, electrocardiograms, cardiac catheterizations, and balloon angioplasties. Cardiovascular technologists help doctors analyze test results and determine the necessary treatments.

To get this job, an associate’s degree is a typical requirement. Many students obtain bachelor’s degrees to enhance their employment opportunities.

Clinical Laboratory Technologists
This type of technologist is a scientist who conducts and analyzes diagnostic tests of bodily fluids and tissues. The tests reveal the cause of patients’ diseases and disorders, and aid doctors in making diagnoses. Clinical laboratory technologists work exclusively in labs, without contact with patients.

A bachelor’s degree in clinical laboratory science, allied health technologies, or a related field is generally needed. Master’s degree programs are necessary only for those seeking lab-management positions.

Medical Laboratory Technicians
These professionals rank just below clinical laboratory technologists. They assist in conducting diagnostic tests of patients’ samples. This involves the use of computers, microscopes, and other sophisticated medical equipment.

Most employers require technicians to have associate’s degrees in clinical laboratory science. Those with degrees in related fields, such as nursing, may become lab technicians by completing one-year programs in general laboratory knowledge. Some employers hire technicians who have earned certificates, rather than degrees, from hospitals or vocational schools.

Diagnostic Medical Sonographers
This technologist uses ultrasound equipment to create images of patients’ organs and other internal parts to detect diseases, illnesses, infections, and disorders. Sonography is a particulary fast-growing field, as the procedure is less intrusive than x-rays and increasingly preferred by patients.

To work in this occupation, a two-year allied-health degree and completion of a one-year ultrasound-technology program are required. Two-year associate’s degree programs in sonography also are available. Professionals with other medical degrees may qualify as ultrasound specialists by completing one-year certificate programs.

Health Care Social Workers
This position involves assisting people in dealing with diseases, illnesses, and disabilities. Health-care social workers educate patients about their conditions, teach coping methods, provide mental-health counseling, and refer patients to medical specialists. The families also receive counseling, while the patient is hospitalized and after returning home.

To get an entry-level job, a two-year bachelor’s degree in social work, psychology, or sociology is often required. Some employers call for master’s degrees in social work, which takes an additional two to four years, followed by residency training. Some universities offer doctorate degrees. These social workers must complete a training program featuring hundreds of hours of field work.

Health Information Technicians
Managing patients’ records and other data in a medical facility is the main responsibility of this professional. Paper and computer files pertaining to financial information, treatments, diagnoses, medications, and exam results must be accurate and up-to-date. Technicians work with insurance companies and other third-party payers, and code medical information for security and billing purposes.

There are several ways to become a registered health information technician (RHIT). Students may take a six-month certificate program in medical technology, or a two-year associate’s degree program in health information management. Four-year bachelor’s degrees in health information technology also are offered by accredited colleges and universities.

Licensed Vocational Nurses
Supervised by registered nurses and doctors, LVNs provide direct health-care services to patients. They monitor vital signs like pulse, blood pressure, respiration rate, and body temperature; collect blood and tissue samples for diagnostic testing; dress wounds and replace bandages; treat bedsores and administer enemas; and help patients stand, walk, eat, bathe, and change clothes.

One-year certificate programs, at community colleges and technical schools (and some hospitals), provide the necessary education to get this job. The programs provide on-the-job training, as well as classwork. Many LVNs obtain two-year associate’s degrees.

Physical Therapy Aides
This job is an entry-level health-care position. PTAs support, move, and lift patients. They educate and train people in rehabilitation methods, help them use orthopedic devices, and provide therapeutic treatments. Aides also have clerical and janitorial responsibilities in the rehab clinics, therapists’ offices, and nursing homes where most of them they are employed.

In many cases, the only educational requirement is a high school diploma or general-equivalency degree. The chances of getting a good job may be improved by taking classes in physical therapy and fitness. Community colleges and technical schools offer certificate programs for aides. Online certificate courses also are available.

Radiology Technicians
Also called x-ray techs, these people obtain x-ray images of patients’ organs and other body parts. Doctors interpret the images to determine the cause and extent of illnesses, diseases, disorders, and injuries. Technicians explain diagnostic procedures and position patients on examining tables.

Successful completion of a certificate program in radiology technology qualifies a student for this position. Such programs are offered by colleges, universities, community colleges, technical schools, and hospitals. Online study is another option. Associate’s degrees at community colleges give students additional credentials, as do bachelor’s degree programs in radiologic technology at larger institutions.

Respiratory Therapists
These professionals work under the supervision of doctors to treat patients who have breathing problems and cardiopulmonary ailments. They order diagnostic tests, then provide therapy to relieve patients’ symptoms and restore their functions.

To practice respiratory therapy, the minimum education requirement is an associate’s degree. To work at a hospital or in emergency medical services, a bachelor’s degree may be necessary.

5 Careers with Great Earning Potential

The cost of attending school to earn degree is more than what most students can afford today. It is therefore not practical for students to train for jobs that don’t provide much earning potential while racking up a lot of debt. Earning potential depends on many different factors. For example, Ivy League Schools like Harvard, Dartmouth and Princeton rank at the top when it comes to the earning potential of students after graduation. However, even students that don’t attend these schools have the opportunity to find a job that pays them well if they select the right degree. Given below are the top 5 most lucrative degrees right now (mid-career as well as starting earning potential numbers taken from PayScale):

  1. Economics

Average Starting Earnings: $48,800

Average Mid-Career Earnings: $97,800

Graduates with an economics degree have the potential to earn a six figure income by the time they reach the mid-career threshold. The Department of Labor states that students with a good understanding and knowledge of economics have the potential to find employment in many different fields today including insurance, finance and business. Potential career paths they can pursue after graduation include Actuary, Economist and Budget Analyst among others.

  1. Information Systems

Average Starting Earnings: $49,300

Average Mid-Career Earnings: $87,100

Information systems graduates have a very bright future because there is a lot of demand for their skills not just in the United States but in countries around the world. The Department of Labor in the U.S. estimates that employment numbers for information systems managers is expected to grow by 17% by 2018. Graduates with an information systems degree have many different career options to consider. Some of the most common positions offered to these graduates include Information Systems Manager, Computer Support Specialist and Systems Administrator.

  1. Actuarial Mathematics

Average Starting Earnings: $56,100

Average Mid-Career Earnings: $112,000

The skills that graduates earn with a degree in Actuarial Mathematics are very specialized and are in great demand in the financial sector. These graduates are employed in pensions, insurance and investment sectors as well as for risk management in larger companies. They can work with actuarial consultancies and have the opportunity to move on to other roles such as career advisors, business operations managers, consultants, alternative risk roles and even in teaching.

  1. Aerospace Engineering

Average Starting Earnings: $62,500

Average Mid-Career Earnings: $118,000

Aerospace Engineers are responsible for the science and the construction of spacecraft and aircraft. Close to 50% of all aerospace engineers worked in the guided missile, aircraft, space vehicle and parts manufacturing industries. A majority of the jobs are provided by federal government agencies but opportunities are also available in architectural and engineering services, business services, electronics and electrical manufacturing, testing and research services.

  1. Petroleum Engineering

Average Starting Earnings: $98,000

Average Mid-Career Earnings: $163,000

Petroleum Engineers have expertise in gas and oil drilling, production and reservoir management. There are several different career options for graduates with petroleum engineering degrees such as drilling engineers, production engineers, reservoir engineers and petroleum geologists. However, their work is often high-risk and they are required to work in remote offshore oil rigs.

Pursuing a degree that leads to very specific positions in a field instead of a variety of options is more likely to result in high paying jobs. Degrees like English and Theater often do not pay that well because they do not lead to very specific positions.

From Engineering A Career Plan to Becoming an Engineer

If scientific facts send your neurons racing one another towards a new idea, if you show attention to details, are creative, have the ability to think logically, and are mathematically inclined when dealing with situations… Then you know you’ve been invaded by the drive to be an engineer.

But are you having second thoughts about engineering?

Then let us share some thoughts on why engineering may be the right fit for you. Apart from our views, many great high school study abroad programs as well as thriving colleges in USA for engineering bear testimony to the success and demand for engineering.

Why Choose Engineering?

To ‘engineer’ literally means to “make things happen”, that should tell tales about the field itself: Engineering is all about progress, about designing, developing, and manufacturing useful products and services for the people. Engineering expertise converts scientific knowledge into technology and as a result fuels innovation. Many seemingly simple aspects of our daily lives have been conceptualized, designed, and developed by an engineer.

Suffice it to say, that our modern world could not have been if it weren’t for the engineers transforming theories into practical gadgets, gizmos, and supersized satellites, etc.

Engineers Have Diverse Careers

Search engineering disciplines, and the search results will simply bamboozle you! There are literally thousands of engineering sub branches covering almost every aspect of our lives. Thin k of computer engineering and you can go anywhere from communication to programming to designing microprocessors and even how to manufacturing these products, and marketing them!

Whatever your interest, engineering most likely has a place for you!

Engineers Get To Do Cool Stuff

Did you know that some companies have special rooms for engineers only? That’s because being an engineer means you get to use high end technologies to develop products.

Engineers are involved in making the future a reality. They are also the first people to get a glimpse at innovations that are most likely to change the way we perceive work, our lives, and our world. Engineers design and build skyscrapers, rocket launches, virtual reality worlds, medicine that cures cancers, and at times get to name new planets.

Engineers Work Everywhere

Engineers are often required to remain on the move: in cities, in regional and rural communities, and even remote wilderness areas. They have to work in diverse areas — some engineers are needed to overlook design of the products and hence work in business offices, others train in classrooms, while still others are found in factories and research labs. Some even work in outer space.

What’s more, many engineers undertaken double degrees and go into medicine, law, business management, or policy. An engineering education will prepare you for many different careers.

Start Your Planning Today!

Plan your engineering careers, search the top colleges in USA for engineering, and other high school study abroad programs, then gain the skills you need for your dream engineering occupation and become a catalyst that makes a difference to the world!

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