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5 Tips for Comparing Majors in Your School

Choosing a major can be a challenge to do. You have to compare the majors that are available in your school carefully so you can choose the right one. You don’t want to get into a situation where you might regret the decision you make. As a result you should see what types of majors are available at a school and use these particular parameters for finding one that’s right for you.

Look At the Courses

Take a look at the coursework that will be required of you in different majors. Various majors will have their own coursework standards that must be followed. Some majors in the field of science might focus more on math-related courses than computer-related ones, for instance. Check to see if the major you want to take has courses that you might actually be interested in.

On a related note, think about the particular internships, student groups and other resources available for you based on the courses you are taking. You might find different groups that have interests that are similar to you based on whatever you want to study.

Consider Your Talents

Take a look at whatever talents you might have. Perhaps you are a good speaker or you have strong writing skills. Take a look at those talents and see what particular majors in your school might be right for you. A great writer could major in journalism, for instance.

What Everyday Skills Are Involved?

The skills you will learn in your major go well beyond just what is needed for you to be successful in a particular job. Everyday skills may also play a big part in your major.

Many majors will entail courses dedicated to solving complicated problems, how to communicate with others and even how to speak particular languages. The variety of skills that you might learn in your major will certainly make a difference.

Look Beyond Salary

While you might hear stories about the amounts of money people with certain majors make, you should ignore those stories. There is always a potential you could earn more or less than whatever someone says your major is worth. Your total earnings will be based heavily on the market you are in, how experienced you are and whether or not you are an efficient worker.

Don’t Think You’re Limited

The last tip is to avoid thinking that there are limits as to what you can do with your college degree depending on the major you are in. The major might help you get into various jobs but that doesn’t mean your future is limited to just those particular jobs.

Try and compare majors based on the specific types of jobs or lines of work people have gotten into. A person with a mathematics degree could be in a sports-related field or in a space-related industry, for instance. You might be surprised at the jobs that are available to you based on a particular major. Therefore, feel free to look around to see what types of jobs you could get out of your particular major.

You should think carefully when you’re trying to find a major that you can be comfortable with. Comparing college majors doesn’t have to be too hard to do if you use the points listed in this guide to help you along. Take a look at as many of these majors as possible and you’ll see that you might get a great total going for your studies.

Degrees That Lead to Best Paying Jobs

Multiple factors come into play when choosing a college major. Your primary challenge is to find a degree program that will qualify you for a career doing the type of work you enjoy.

Another consideration is how much money you can expect to make in your first job. You want to be able to pay off student loans as soon as possible, and begin living the life you envision. Here is a look at the degrees that produce the highest starting salaries for graduates.

Overview
It likely comes as no surprise to any college-bound student that degree programs in science and business lead to some of the best-paying jobs. It also is commonly understood that a high salary is not among the rewards of being a teacher or social worker.

Engineering is at the top of the list. Employment in one of this discipline’s myriad specialties featured an average starting salary of $63,000 in 2013. Computer-science majors and business grads were next at $60,000 and $54,000, respectively. Beginning jobs in communications paid $43,000; math and sciences, $42,700; education, $40,000; and humanities and social sciences, $37,000.

Keep mind that these are average figures, with some positions in each field paying more than others. The statistics were compiled by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE), a nonprofit organization based in Bethlehem, Penn. It connects private companies seeking employees with career-placement offices at universities.

The NACE study, commissioned by The Associated Press, used information from the U.S. Census Bureau, the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics, and private sources like the Job Search Intelligence firm. Data was obtained from nearly 90 universities and colleges.

Engineering
The education and expertise required to be an engineer are not the only reasons that such jobs pay the most money. It is also because of the demand for engineers. Employers continue to report a shortage of qualified applicants for positions in this field.

Of the 10 college majors that lead to the highest salaries, seven involve engineering. Ranking in first place in 2013 were graduates with degrees in petroleum engineering. Their starting pay averaged $96,200. Computer engineers placed second among all graduates, at $70,300. Coming in third were chemical engineering majors, at $66,900.

Students of aerospace, aeronautical and astronautical engineering tied for the fifth-highest starting salaries. They earned an average of $63,900, the same as that paid to mechanical engineering graduates. Next on the list were those who majored in electrical, electronics and communications engineering. They got an average of $62,500. Engineering technology, at $60,900, placed eighth among all professions.

Others on the List
While engineering jobs dominated the list, the study found several other disciplines that paid extremely well. Computer science degrees netted the fourth-best starting pay ($64,100). Finishing ninth and 10th were business management information systems ($60,300) and logistics and materials management ($59,500).

The degrees that led to the lowest-paying starting salaries are those in child and family studies, $29,500; elementary education, $31,600; social work, $31,800; athletic training, $32,800; culinary arts, $35,900; horticulture, $35,000; and theology, $34,700.

Salary Trends
Students who graduated in health sciences in 2013 saw the largest spike in pay, making 9.4 percent more than in 2012 to raise the average to $50,000. Business degrees netted about about $54,000, 7.1 percent more than they did the previous year. Salaries for education graduates were up 5.1 percent to about $40,000, while those for computer-science majors rose 4.3 percent to $60,000.

Beginning jobs in engineering professions paid 4 percent more than in 2012. The smallest increase, 1.9 percent, was reported in the humanities and social sciences. Starting salaries for those careers were about $37,000 in 2013.

However, some social-science professionals are in demand. The starting pay for sociologists soared 10.8 percent in 2013. Criminal justice majors earned 8.1 percent more than in the previous year. At the other end of the scale, those with degrees in the arts made 3 percent less, averaging $35,600.

Conclusion
In general, salaries for college graduates are on the rise. NACE reported that those who received bachelor’s degrees in 2013 received an average starting salary of about $45,000, a 5.3 percent increase from the previous year.

However, the study also found that 53.6 percent of 2013 graduates either did not have a job, or were considered underemployed, as of April that year. This demonstrates the value of earning a degree in a field that needs qualified professionals.

From Engineering A Career Plan to Becoming an Engineer

If scientific facts send your neurons racing one another towards a new idea, if you show attention to details, are creative, have the ability to think logically, and are mathematically inclined when dealing with situations… Then you know you’ve been invaded by the drive to be an engineer.

But are you having second thoughts about engineering?

Then let us share some thoughts on why engineering may be the right fit for you. Apart from our views, many great high school study abroad programs as well as thriving colleges in USA for engineering bear testimony to the success and demand for engineering.

Why Choose Engineering?

To ‘engineer’ literally means to “make things happen”, that should tell tales about the field itself: Engineering is all about progress, about designing, developing, and manufacturing useful products and services for the people. Engineering expertise converts scientific knowledge into technology and as a result fuels innovation. Many seemingly simple aspects of our daily lives have been conceptualized, designed, and developed by an engineer.

Suffice it to say, that our modern world could not have been if it weren’t for the engineers transforming theories into practical gadgets, gizmos, and supersized satellites, etc.

Engineers Have Diverse Careers

Search engineering disciplines, and the search results will simply bamboozle you! There are literally thousands of engineering sub branches covering almost every aspect of our lives. Thin k of computer engineering and you can go anywhere from communication to programming to designing microprocessors and even how to manufacturing these products, and marketing them!

Whatever your interest, engineering most likely has a place for you!

Engineers Get To Do Cool Stuff

Did you know that some companies have special rooms for engineers only? That’s because being an engineer means you get to use high end technologies to develop products.

Engineers are involved in making the future a reality. They are also the first people to get a glimpse at innovations that are most likely to change the way we perceive work, our lives, and our world. Engineers design and build skyscrapers, rocket launches, virtual reality worlds, medicine that cures cancers, and at times get to name new planets.

Engineers Work Everywhere

Engineers are often required to remain on the move: in cities, in regional and rural communities, and even remote wilderness areas. They have to work in diverse areas — some engineers are needed to overlook design of the products and hence work in business offices, others train in classrooms, while still others are found in factories and research labs. Some even work in outer space.

What’s more, many engineers undertaken double degrees and go into medicine, law, business management, or policy. An engineering education will prepare you for many different careers.

Start Your Planning Today!

Plan your engineering careers, search the top colleges in USA for engineering, and other high school study abroad programs, then gain the skills you need for your dream engineering occupation and become a catalyst that makes a difference to the world!

Choosing the right career path

Are you fresh out of high school and filling college applications?

Confused about choosing your majors?

Well, you are not the only one. It is a daunting task for many. But, you need to understand what will work best for you.

Understand Your Interests

Your first step in contemplating your career choice is to evaluate your interests and aspirations. It is easy to settle in a career that comes along your way only to realize that it isn’t what you want. If you thoroughly understand your interests, you can choose a path which best aligns with what you like to do. For example: if you are artistic and good at drawing or painting, you can choose a career as an architect, artist, or designer.

Identifying Social Needs

You need to know if you are a peoples person or too shy to work as part of a team. These behaviors can also influence the choice of your career. If you like to deliver value from behind the scenes, a career in actuary or accounting may be suitable (if you are good with numeric also). If you are energetic and moved by others needs, social work or marketing may be your field.

Research

When you understand your interests and evaluate what you would like to do, start gathering information about it. Visit the university or college and talk to professors and counselors. Attend career expos, and if those aren’t available then use the internet to learn about different careers and what they entail.

Understand the subjects that each career path has to offer and how they would relate to your interests; whether you would like to study those subjects. Once you think you have made a list of possible careers you can opt, talk to professionals in those fields. Firsthand knowledge of others experience in the particular field will give you a better understanding of the practical side of it.

Speaking to Career Counselors

Talk to your career counselor. Talking to someone before making your decision can help you clarify any queries and concerns. The counselor can also tell you about more careers and the college options for their availability and criteria.

Taking a Test

There are many tests which help in identifying possible careers based on your interests and personality. One popular test is the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. Seek help when undertaking a test to understand and interpret the results and be cautious as many tests are also paid.

Long-Term Goals

Choosing a career is like choosing the route you would like to take into your future, where you would build a life for yourself. So, it is extremely important to be rational and open-minded about the decision to take. Have a vision and know your end point where you want to be. The position you would like to have or the income you want to earn. Tracing those steps backwards will help you clarify your starting point of choosing a career.

Intern or Volunteer

Utilize your summers in acquiring an internship or volunteer work. The practical exposure will help you clear any doubts and also pave way for a future job. It will also help to further develop your skills and introduce you to work ethics and environment.

In the end, never be afraid to step up and seek the right information to make the best career choice for you. Make phone calls and get in touch with people who can guide you and provide useful information. Don’t shy away from talking to your counselor and do not make assumptions about any particular field. Be open in your assessment approach and along the process develop an understanding about yourself also.

6 Points to Ponder Before Changing Your Major

Students are often pressured to select a college major before college even begins. If classes have started and you just don’t feel like you’ve made the right choice, it may be time to reevaluate. Here are some things to consider before you make the jump from one major to another.

Think through your new interest

You may find yourself going through a rough time. This can lead to decisions that you wouldn’t normally make. So, before you change your major, determine why you want to do so. If you just had a bad experience in one class, don’t let that get you down. If you had a rough semester because of roommate or family issues, evaluate that. If you had a life changing event that prompted your interest in a new course of study, or if you are having difficulty with every single course, it may be time to make a change.

Talk to your advisor

Discussing your intentions with your advisor is one of the most important things to do. Changing majors can often extend your college career and cost more money. You need to be sure a new major is right for you and determine whether or not you have the time and finances to pursue another path. Additionally, your advisor may tell you that your concerns are very common and that you may want to wait before making a final decision.

Talk to other students

Talk to students who are majoring in what you are considering. Ask questions about their thoughts on the program so far. What do they enjoy or dislike about their major? How do they feel about the professors and potential career opportunities? What are their career goals? If their interests and career goals match yours, you may be more confident that the change is right for you.

Review the coursework

What kind of classes are required for the major you’re considering? If the classes excite you, you may be on the right path. However, if there are never ending math classes and your strong subject is writing, you may want to reconsider. Don’t be afraid of your challenging yourself, but be realistic about your strengths and weaknesses.

Review the job market

Visit your campus career center to learn more about careers in your current major vs. those in your potential major. Where are there the most jobs? Are people actually hiring in the field you’re considering? Remember, you want to find a career you will enjoy and succeed at. You also need to determine if the salary, living situation and job locations fit your expectations.

Make a list

Once you’ve completed the suggestions listed above, make a list of the pros and cons of each major, as well as the pros and cons of changing your major. This will help you see the big picture. You may decide you’re not quite ready for a change and that you need more time to think about it.

Selecting a college major is an important decision, and not one to be taken lightly. However, remember that your major will rarely limit you to one career path for the rest of your life. Your strengths and passions, combined with your education can help you land a dream job that has nothing to do with what you majored in.

Acclaimed Engineering Schools

Some of the highest-paying occupations are in engineering. First-year salaries for graduates with bachelor’s degrees in 2013 averaged $63,000, according to the nonprofit National Association of Colleges and Employers. Seven of the 10 college degree programs that result in the most lucrative salaries involve engineering.

Petroleum engineering featured the highest starting pay ($96,200) among all majors in 2013. Beginning computer engineers placed second at $70,300, with engineering majors ranking third at $66,900. Students of aerospace, aeronautical and astronautical engineering and those with degrees in mechanical engineering tied for fourth at $63,900. Graduates in electrical, electronics, and communications engineering netted an average of $62,500. Engineering technology, at $60,900, placed eighth among all occupations.

Engineering jobs pay so well in part because of the significant financial investment in education, and years of hard work, required to become an engineer. Another reason for the high salaries is the shortage of many types of engineers.

Students who are interested in engineering may want to consider the rewards of majoring in one of the discipline’s numerous specialties. Many colleges and universities offer degree programs in various engineering fields.

The Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, as well as U.S. News & World Report, have compiled lists of the top schools for engineering majors. Here is a look at the universities receiving the highest marks.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

The famed MIT in Cambridge, Mass., ranked at the top of the lists published by the ABET and U.S. News in 2013. That year, 3,163 students were majoring in engineering at the school. The annual tuition for a full-time student was $41,770.

MIT, according to the ABET, has the best aerospace, aeronautical, and astronautical engineering program. The organization also placed MIT at the top for chemical; computer; electrical, electronic, and communications; and mechanical engineering.

Stanford University

Both lists featured California’s Stanford University ranking alongside MIT as the best engineering schools that offer doctorate degrees. Stanford’s engineering enrollment in 2013 was 3,548 students, with a tuition rate of $43,950.

No engineering school has better degree programs for environmental and environmental-health engineering students, according to the ABET. However, Stanford is a tough school to get into, as it accepts fewer than 10 percent of student applicants.

University of California-Berkeley

Tied for first in the ABET rankings and third on the U.S. News list was the University of California-Berkeley. It had an engineering enrollment of 1,837 students and a tuition rate of $11,220 ($26,322 for out-of-staters) in 2013.

UC-Berkeley, which has been called the nation’s best public university, is top-ranked by ABET in civil engineering. It is second in chemical engineering, as well as environmental and environmental-health engineering.

California Institute of Technology

The California Institute of Technology, in Pasadena, is among the most famous engineering schools. It placed fourth on the U.S. News list. CIT had 587 engineering students and a tuition rate of $38,084 in 2013.

Carnegie Mellon University

Coming in fifth on the U.S. News list was Carnegie Mellon University, in Pittsburgh, Penn. It is renowned for programs in an array of science and engineering fields. The engineering enrollment was 2,857 students, with a tuition rate of $38,900, in 2013.

These are just some of the options for students looking for a good engineering school. The Georgia Institute of Technology, Purdue University, the University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign, and the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor also have won praise.

According to the ABET, the best undergraduate engineering programs (where doctorates are not available) are at the Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in Terre Haute, Ind.; Harvey Mudd College in Claremont, Calif.; and the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, N.Y.

The Online College Database reported that Northwestern University has the most degree programs in engineering. Next on that list are the Missouri University of Science and Technology, North Carolina State University at Raleigh, the Colorado School of Mines, and the University of Southern California.

Money is not the only factor in choosing a major and deciding upon a career. Students are advised to focus on occupations that they enjoy doing. Those who like engineering can pursue their passion and make a lot of money. They may want to consider applying to some of the schools on these lists.

Choosing a University: What Colleges Don't tell you

Getting the right college degree from the right university will probably one of the most important decisions of your life concern. Some of the most important factors in selecting the right university are:

Where Should You Attend?

The first decision should be whether to attend a school in your home state, out of state or a school in another country. One thing that will influence this, aside from cost, is whether you want to be close to your family and friends. Some college students enjoy the sense of freedom and adventure of being in a new place.

Think About the Career You Want

Not every school offers the best training in the field you want to enter. Some universities have a reputation for offering excellent courses in some fields. For example, MIT is known as a top-class university for people who are into technology. Check the website and look at the course listings and the curriculum of the schools you are most interested in attending.

What Can You Afford?

The amount you can afford to pay will have to play a big role in choosing a college. If you will have to depend on scholarships and financial aid to get through, make sure to find out what is available. Some schools will have more scholarships and funding opportunities.

Extra-Curricular Activities

If you are big on a particular sport, you should make sure that you choose schools that participate in these sporting activities. If you are a player, choose schools that will make it possible for you to play. If you enjoy going to clubs and giving back to the community, the school should offer these opportunities as well. Any college you consider should ideally have an interest in culture, sports, volunteering and being socially active.

You also need to be realistic about your choices. Some schools are extremely difficult to get into, so make sure to apply not only to the top schools but also to good, middle-tier schools. Other things that will help you in making a decision when doing your research are:

  • Your emphasis on religion: If this is important to you, find out if places of worship are on campus or if they are close by
  • What others think about your choices: Talk to current students and alumni about their own experiences in college. Alumni are a great source of information if the programs helped them meet their career expectations. Current students can share their feelings and insight into the university
  • Available resources and facilities: If for example you are planning to study the sciences, look for schools with well-equipped labs
  • The meal option that is available: For religious or personal reasons you might not eat certain foods. Make sure you will be able to get the food you want whether on campus or nearby. If this is not possible, find out if you can cook on your dorm.

After careful consideration, you should ideally have three or four schools that fit the bill. These schools should be at the top of your list. The advice as to how many schools to apply to varies, with some people suggesting a minimum of three, while others saying six. However, it is up to you to decide how many applications to send out. Talk to your school counselor and your parents to help you make a decision. Some students send out over 10 college applications to increase their chances of gaining admission to one.

Be practical in your selection of a school. With research and effort, you can find the ideal college at which to further your education. Just make sure that you are choosing a college for the right reason. Finally, if possible, visit the campuses to get a firsthand view of what is available.

Choosing the Ideal Course for Your Dream Career

Deciding which university to attend is difficult enough but you will also need to decide which course to sign up for to get your dream job. If you already know your dream career, you’re halfway there. However, you’ll also need to learn how to get to that dream career. Deciding which course to select will depend greatly on the kind of job you want after graduating. This guide will provide you the help you need to select a course that fits the bill:

Meet a career counselor

One of the best things to do to find the right course is to actually get help from a career counselor or a student advisor. A career counselor will be able to guide you in the right direction with good information as well as personal experiences.

Identifying your abilities and interests

Identify your academic strengths and your interests. Begin with a broader search area to decide which field interests you and then decide on the concrete subjects. Self assessment tests can be found online to help you understand what type of career you are best suited for.

Research

Once you know which career is the most suitable for you, the next step would be to research to learn more about the job prospects for that career. Get more information by talking to other students, professors or by searching online. Learn more about the courses you are interested in by checking the websites of various universities. Talk to professionals working in the industry as well as to graduates to get an insider’s perspective.

Course outline

Before signing up for courses at the university, always check the course outline to ensure that it will cover the subjects you are interested in learning. Learn more about the examinations, types of assignments and learning methodology for the course so you know what to expect. You will also need to learn more about the course duration and whether you want to study part-time or full-time.

Admission requirements

Certain courses tend to be very competitive and it may be very hard to get accepted for those courses. Some courses are also too difficult to complete successfully, even if you have good academic capabilities. Be realistic and honest when it comes to course selection. If you are not quite confident of being accepted into a particular university, check similar courses offered at other universities that might be easier to get in.

Cost

While the course you select might be perfect for you in every aspect, affordability is also a crucial factor to consider. Other than the tuition, there might be additional costs for field trips and text books that you may not have accounted for. However, there are several financial aid options available today that may help you so it would be a good idea to look into these options.

The right course can propel you in the right direction and increase your chances of getting a job you always wanted so it is important to spend a considerable amount of time researching and comparing your options.

A Guide to Finding the Right University

When deciding which university to attend, you may receive a lot of instructions, tips and guidance from others. There’s too much information to analyze and understand and much research to do, leaving you feeling lost and confused. There are several factors that need to be considered when selecting a university. This guide will provide you a list of things you should look into so you can find a university that truly fits your academic goals:

Admission requirements

Every university has different admission requirements so you will need to find out if you have the relevant prerequisites to get admission for the program you want to enroll for. Talk to the admission representatives of the university, the guidance counselor or search the university website to get more information about whether or not you will be able to get in.

Location

Moving away may help you feel and become more independent. However, you may want to be close enough to home so that you will have easy access to your family when you need their support the most. An ideal university should be no more than six hours away from your home. The geographical location of a university is a major factor that should be considered.

Cost

One of the most important factors to consider when comparing universities is the cost. Ensure that you include the tuition, program quality, board and room, transportation cost and the cost of social activities, when you calculate a year’s cost of studying at a particular university.

Financial aid

Studying at a university can be quite expensive today and not everyone can get full financial support from their families. It is therefore important to get more information about the financial aid options available at the university. While bursaries and entrance scholarships are available in almost every university, you may want to learn more about the requirements to determine which university will accommodate your financial requirements the best.

Academic program

The quality of programs within the university will vary greatly. For example, some universities offer excellent art programs but may not have equally good technical programs. Learn more about the kind of offers students get after graduation, program duration, class size and other details that will help you understand how well a particular university is suited to your needs.

Student feedback

Talk to other students at the university to learn more about their experience. It is important to understand that every student will have a different experience at the same university. Keep an open mind and gather more information about what others think about the academic programs, professors, job prospects and class sizes. Don’t be afraid to ask questions to students.

The university you attend will have a long-term impact on your life and is therefore a decision that should be made after much deliberation. Prepare a list of universities that perform well on all the factors discussed above and visit them all personally. This will help you make an informed decision that works well in your favor.

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