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5 Tips For Finding Scholarships

A college education can cost tens of thousands of dollars to attain. The struggles that may come with student loans can especially become a burden to your life. Therefore, you have to find financial aid in order to help you keep the cost down. The best way to do this is through a scholarship.

Scholarships are given to all sorts of students who meet particular qualifications. These will cover a sizeable part of the cost of an education. They are also given out to a variety of students for various purposes that vary by each option available.

The odds are there is a scholarship out there right now that you can qualify for. However, you must find such a scholarship to make it work for you. There are many great tips to follow when it comes to finding scholarships that you can qualify for.

Start Early

You have to start looking for scholarships as early as possible. It is easier to find scholarships when you do it earlier as that means you won’t have to worry about too many of them being taken.

This is especially ideal if you are about to go to college. Starting your search for scholarships before your senior year of high school is always a good idea as it gives you time to find what you are looking for.

Check Local Groups

You should look to see what local groups in your area have to offer when finding scholarships. Many local groups like churches, civic groups, business unions and even local banks may offer scholarships to people in your area. You might have an easier time finding a scholarship from a local entity than anywhere else, what with the competition for those scholarships being substantially less than what you might find elsewhere.

Look At the Requirements

There are various requirements that deserve to be seen when it comes to finding scholarships. Some might be based on the field of study you are in or the GPA you hold. Others might be focused on people who engage in community service activities. Others can focus on people who hold certain hobbies. The requirements for a scholarship will vary so make sure you look at them and see if you qualify for them.

Check Online Regularly

There are always new scholarships being posted online every day. These include many scholarships that are easy to search through on many databases. Be advised that many of these scholarships are available throughout the country but it never hurts to get your name in for consideration for one of them.

Put In Enough Effort

The last tip is to always put in a strong effort when trying to get a scholarship. You might feel down at times in the event that you cannot get the scholarships that you want. However, that does not mean you should give up. Put in a strong effort no matter how many times you are turned down for scholarships. Remember, there are so many options out there that there is certainly one out of that can be of benefit to you and your studies.

Scholarships can be rather easy to find if you simply know what to look for. Make sure you get out there to take a careful look at the different scholarships that are available for your use as you might be surprised at the options that you could potentially qualify for.

Degrees That Lead to Best Paying Jobs

Multiple factors come into play when choosing a college major. Your primary challenge is to find a degree program that will qualify you for a career doing the type of work you enjoy.

Another consideration is how much money you can expect to make in your first job. You want to be able to pay off student loans as soon as possible, and begin living the life you envision. Here is a look at the degrees that produce the highest starting salaries for graduates.

Overview
It likely comes as no surprise to any college-bound student that degree programs in science and business lead to some of the best-paying jobs. It also is commonly understood that a high salary is not among the rewards of being a teacher or social worker.

Engineering is at the top of the list. Employment in one of this discipline’s myriad specialties featured an average starting salary of $63,000 in 2013. Computer-science majors and business grads were next at $60,000 and $54,000, respectively. Beginning jobs in communications paid $43,000; math and sciences, $42,700; education, $40,000; and humanities and social sciences, $37,000.

Keep mind that these are average figures, with some positions in each field paying more than others. The statistics were compiled by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE), a nonprofit organization based in Bethlehem, Penn. It connects private companies seeking employees with career-placement offices at universities.

The NACE study, commissioned by The Associated Press, used information from the U.S. Census Bureau, the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics, and private sources like the Job Search Intelligence firm. Data was obtained from nearly 90 universities and colleges.

Engineering
The education and expertise required to be an engineer are not the only reasons that such jobs pay the most money. It is also because of the demand for engineers. Employers continue to report a shortage of qualified applicants for positions in this field.

Of the 10 college majors that lead to the highest salaries, seven involve engineering. Ranking in first place in 2013 were graduates with degrees in petroleum engineering. Their starting pay averaged $96,200. Computer engineers placed second among all graduates, at $70,300. Coming in third were chemical engineering majors, at $66,900.

Students of aerospace, aeronautical and astronautical engineering tied for the fifth-highest starting salaries. They earned an average of $63,900, the same as that paid to mechanical engineering graduates. Next on the list were those who majored in electrical, electronics and communications engineering. They got an average of $62,500. Engineering technology, at $60,900, placed eighth among all professions.

Others on the List
While engineering jobs dominated the list, the study found several other disciplines that paid extremely well. Computer science degrees netted the fourth-best starting pay ($64,100). Finishing ninth and 10th were business management information systems ($60,300) and logistics and materials management ($59,500).

The degrees that led to the lowest-paying starting salaries are those in child and family studies, $29,500; elementary education, $31,600; social work, $31,800; athletic training, $32,800; culinary arts, $35,900; horticulture, $35,000; and theology, $34,700.

Salary Trends
Students who graduated in health sciences in 2013 saw the largest spike in pay, making 9.4 percent more than in 2012 to raise the average to $50,000. Business degrees netted about about $54,000, 7.1 percent more than they did the previous year. Salaries for education graduates were up 5.1 percent to about $40,000, while those for computer-science majors rose 4.3 percent to $60,000.

Beginning jobs in engineering professions paid 4 percent more than in 2012. The smallest increase, 1.9 percent, was reported in the humanities and social sciences. Starting salaries for those careers were about $37,000 in 2013.

However, some social-science professionals are in demand. The starting pay for sociologists soared 10.8 percent in 2013. Criminal justice majors earned 8.1 percent more than in the previous year. At the other end of the scale, those with degrees in the arts made 3 percent less, averaging $35,600.

Conclusion
In general, salaries for college graduates are on the rise. NACE reported that those who received bachelor’s degrees in 2013 received an average starting salary of about $45,000, a 5.3 percent increase from the previous year.

However, the study also found that 53.6 percent of 2013 graduates either did not have a job, or were considered underemployed, as of April that year. This demonstrates the value of earning a degree in a field that needs qualified professionals.

5 Careers with Great Earning Potential

The cost of attending school to earn degree is more than what most students can afford today. It is therefore not practical for students to train for jobs that don’t provide much earning potential while racking up a lot of debt. Earning potential depends on many different factors. For example, Ivy League Schools like Harvard, Dartmouth and Princeton rank at the top when it comes to the earning potential of students after graduation. However, even students that don’t attend these schools have the opportunity to find a job that pays them well if they select the right degree. Given below are the top 5 most lucrative degrees right now (mid-career as well as starting earning potential numbers taken from PayScale):

  1. Economics

Average Starting Earnings: $48,800

Average Mid-Career Earnings: $97,800

Graduates with an economics degree have the potential to earn a six figure income by the time they reach the mid-career threshold. The Department of Labor states that students with a good understanding and knowledge of economics have the potential to find employment in many different fields today including insurance, finance and business. Potential career paths they can pursue after graduation include Actuary, Economist and Budget Analyst among others.

  1. Information Systems

Average Starting Earnings: $49,300

Average Mid-Career Earnings: $87,100

Information systems graduates have a very bright future because there is a lot of demand for their skills not just in the United States but in countries around the world. The Department of Labor in the U.S. estimates that employment numbers for information systems managers is expected to grow by 17% by 2018. Graduates with an information systems degree have many different career options to consider. Some of the most common positions offered to these graduates include Information Systems Manager, Computer Support Specialist and Systems Administrator.

  1. Actuarial Mathematics

Average Starting Earnings: $56,100

Average Mid-Career Earnings: $112,000

The skills that graduates earn with a degree in Actuarial Mathematics are very specialized and are in great demand in the financial sector. These graduates are employed in pensions, insurance and investment sectors as well as for risk management in larger companies. They can work with actuarial consultancies and have the opportunity to move on to other roles such as career advisors, business operations managers, consultants, alternative risk roles and even in teaching.

  1. Aerospace Engineering

Average Starting Earnings: $62,500

Average Mid-Career Earnings: $118,000

Aerospace Engineers are responsible for the science and the construction of spacecraft and aircraft. Close to 50% of all aerospace engineers worked in the guided missile, aircraft, space vehicle and parts manufacturing industries. A majority of the jobs are provided by federal government agencies but opportunities are also available in architectural and engineering services, business services, electronics and electrical manufacturing, testing and research services.

  1. Petroleum Engineering

Average Starting Earnings: $98,000

Average Mid-Career Earnings: $163,000

Petroleum Engineers have expertise in gas and oil drilling, production and reservoir management. There are several different career options for graduates with petroleum engineering degrees such as drilling engineers, production engineers, reservoir engineers and petroleum geologists. However, their work is often high-risk and they are required to work in remote offshore oil rigs.

Pursuing a degree that leads to very specific positions in a field instead of a variety of options is more likely to result in high paying jobs. Degrees like English and Theater often do not pay that well because they do not lead to very specific positions.

Making Money - Options for Part Time Jobs

University fees are rising each year and funding is increasingly sparse. Most students have to consider part-time jobs to earn a little extra cash to support their studies. Part-time employment can also help you develop teamwork, organizational and time management skills. It provides students an insight into working life and helps prepare them for their careers. Given below are a few employment options available to university students today:

Computer lab attendant or tech jobs

Computer labs in universities often need tech support or lab attendants and this is an ideal job for someone who is tech-savvy. This type of job usually pays quite well and it also provides students valuable real world experience if they are planning a career in the IT industry.

Library jobs

Most universities have library jobs listed on campus that students can take advantage of. Library jobs are much more than just checking out material and helping other students with their requests. These jobs require secretarial duties, data entry, inter-library loans and use of the library’s search system. Libraries also offer a very low-key, comfortable environment to work in and are therefore excellent opportunities for students.

Gym jobs

A very large number of universities today have gyms and these can provide good part-time opportunities to students. College gyms usually have a huge demand for employees who can organize equipment, provide customer service and perform other management related functions. Students can also take up jobs providing personal training or taking aerobics, yoga or other fitness classes at the gym. For those who are fitness savvy and a little experienced, this can provide an excellent income opportunity.

Dorm desk attendants

Although it is one of the most overlooked jobs, a desk attendant job in university dorm is in fact one of the best opportunities available on campus. Usually the job is quite slow paced and does not require a lot of hours. It provides students good experience while providing a higher income potential.

Teaching assistants

PhD students and a few master’s students can make a good amount of money as a teaching assistant within the university. These jobs are usually quite well paid and also offer an insight into the academic profession. Teaching also helps students learn better and helps them develop several transferable skills that will prove to be useful later in their careers.

Off-campus jobs

There are also several good part-time job opportunities available off-campus. Local employers usually recruit part-time and casual employees or busy periods like summer and Christmas. Jobs in retail, hospitality and even part-time office jobs allow students to network in their chosen field, gain valuable experience and earn money while at college.

While there are several ways in which students can earn money at college, it is also essential to manage time well and ensure that they have enough time available to dedicate to their studies. Most universities recommend their students to work no more than 15 hours a week so they can manage all their academic obligations.

Work Study Balance - Getting it Right

Even student loans and scholarships are sometimes not enough to cover all your college expenses. For this reason, many college students have full or part-time jobs. This is a reality of modern life, and those who are able to manage working and studying at the same time, find the experience rewarding. If work begins to get in the way, it is best to seek another job or reschedule your school workload.

If you are a new college student who is unemployed, you can start looking for a job when you get your course schedule. There are actually many job opportunities for college students, and some of them can be found right on campus. Many colleges provide their students with employment to help make ends meet.  These jobs include library monitor, campus administration, tour guide, or working in the campus bookstore. Other good part-time job options for university students are:

  • Teaching assistant: Some college seniors and postgraduate students sometimes assist in teaching college freshmen. The job may also include helping out during exams and grading papers. Talk to a professor to find out if there are openings available.
  • IT technician: The campus office or nearby businesses sometimes need people with technical skills to help in maintaining their computer infrastructure. Keep an eye on the notice board and check the classified ads to see if companies are looking for workers with the kind of skills you have.
  • Production assistant: Many local playhouses or theater companies are always looking for people to help in staging their events. The college’s drama group might have positions available as well.
  • Fast food worker or wait staff: Some college students work part time in the restaurant industry. Those lucky enough to get jobs in high-end restaurants can make a lot of money in tips.

Many college students who want to work will have to do a lot of searching before they find a job. Most of them do not need to earn a lot of money. The important thing is that the income helps them to cover additional expenses like rent or food.

Managing Work and School

No matter how small the job is, it will not be easy for any student to do it while giving enough time to their studies. The following tips are helpful in learning to balance both school and work, whether they are working full-time or part-time.

  • Set clear goals: When you have a sense of what you want to achieve this will help to keep you focus. Goals help to motivate you and keep you aware of what needs to be done and when. Do not hesitate to treat yourself as a reward for accomplishing each goal.
  • Develop time management skills: This is important if you expect to do your job and fulfil you school obligations. Create a timetable, and make sure that your job does not clash with your classes. Assign some time for studying for tests and completing assignments.
  • Get enough rest: You will not be able to do well at work or in class if you are not sleeping enough and getting adequate rest. As a working student, you may have to skip some of the partying and other types of entertainment.
  • Ask for advice: Your faculty advisor, professor and even other students can offer a lot of guidance to help you maintain a balance between work and school. Do not hesitate to talk to someone if you are having problems, especially if you cannot meet your deadlines.
  • Talk to your employer: Make sure that your employer knows that you are attending college. Some business owners will do their best to help their workers who are studying by offering employees more flexible working hours. They might even provide time off to study for exams.
  • Join a study group: This is a good way to catch up on those topics you missed because you were late for class or were unable to attend classes.  Study groups also help you better understand topics you may have difficulty understanding.

College students who exercise are better focused and less stressed, so this is especially important if you are working and studying at the same time. So it is also a good idea to join the gym to help keep you stress level down. As a college student who is working, you will need to learn how to say no to family and friends sometimes. Remember that your goal is to complete your studies successfully. You should not let personal tasks and activities get in the way unless an emergency is involved.

8 Easy Sources of Employment at College

Working during college can be a huge struggle. But the first part of that struggle is finding work during college. Luckily there are many community resources dedicated to the search for work.

1. Your School

Consider working at your school or at the very least checking with your school to see if they have any job postings. Your school may also be able to match you with paid and unpaid internships that are related to your field of study. In fact, some schools go as far as REQUIRING internships for students in certain programs.

2. Your Place of Worship

As strange as it may sound, your place of worship is often a brilliant place where you can make lots of connections and learn of new job opportunities. If you do not have a place of worship consider trying to make connections through a club of people with similar interests. Often times there are plenty of job opportunities within circles of acquaintances. Churches also have job opportunities posted on bulletin boards.

3. Your Family

Consider working for a relative who has a family business. Note: this may not work for those who are seeking internships for academic reasons as most schools will prohibit students from earning credit based on an internship completed at a family business. If you are looking for an internship for credit it may be best to look elsewhere.

4. Uncle Sam (Government)

Yup, you guessed it! One of the largest employers of students is good old Uncle Sam, AKA the United States government. The same is often true for other governments. The United States government offers a variety of internships. The main program is the Pathways program. Internships in this program are typically highly competitive but also very well-paying. Expect the selection process to include a security clearance. Unfortunately at this time the program is not open to those who are noncitizens.

 5. Look at your Town’s Largest Employers

Look at your town’s largest employers. Consider what type of industry your town is known for. Certain towns are known as tourist destinations. Tourist destinations in particular often hire students during the summer which coincides with when most school breaks occur. Of course other industries also have many different programs available to students.

6. Research Opportunities with Large Corporations

Large, nationwide corporations often offer internship opportunities to promising and upcoming students with lots of talent in a specific area. Large corporations like Target offer a variety of internships in the IT, business analysis, marketing, and pharmacology fields. Other corporations such as Petsmart

7. Look for Startups

Startup companies are looking for young, eager, fresh-faced and brilliant people with lots of different ideas. Start-ups may not always offer the most pay but it can be great knowing that you contributed to something as monumental as a new company. New companies offer a chance to grow your career and show your leadership skills.

8. Do Volunteer Work

Okay, so maybe it’s not paid work! But volunteering can provide you with a lot of great life experience. It also looks impressive on a resume and if you volunteer somewhere there is a significant chance that, if you play your cards right, it could lead to lots of more permanent employment. It also shows a lot of drive and initiative. But more importantly it shows that you have compassion and that money is not your biggest goal in life. Future employers will look for ‘whole people’ who respect others and have compassion. Volunteering is a nice, big way for you to show that to a prospective new boss for any paid job.

Ways to make money while in college

Going to college is expensive. For many students, simply covering the cost of tuition, fees, and room and board is a challenge. After paying those expenses, there may be little left in your budget. You need some spending money to fully enjoy the university experience. Going out with your friends, or just having pizza delivered to your dorm, requires cash. There are many ways students can make money while in college.

On Campus

An array of part-time jobs is available on university campuses. They may not pay much, but usually can be crafted around your schedule of classes and school activities. You can work in an administrative office, the cafeteria, the library or another university facility. Sign up to be a residence assistant, in the dorms; or a professor’s assistant, grading papers and doing research. Find out if a custodian job is available. Fraternities and sororities often hire students to do housecleaning and other chores. Take part in a research study, or take notes in class and sell them. Some colleges hire students to give campus tours to prospective students, or conduct orientation sessions for incoming freshmen.

Parents are increasingly hiring tutors to help their children. Many university students also need assistance with their studies. There are always students, in high school and college, who require individual instruction in math, science or other subjects. You also may be able to give music lessons or assist kids with other artistic pursuits. Determine your strongest subject, then post flyers and perhaps advertise in a college publication. Check to see if there are any local tutoring services that hire students. Check out the Sylvan and Kumon tutoring services, and visit tutor.com.

In the Community

Other types of jobs may be found off campus, in the community. If your college is in a small town, you have fewer opportunities. You have to be creative, patient and persistent. Prepare a resume and learn good interviewing skills. You need to sell yourself to an employer, so do not be bashful about emphasizing your knowledge and skills.

Retailers frequently hire students for sales clerk, cashier and other positions. Many are willing to work around students’ schedules. Start by speaking with owners of stores selling things that you find interesting. Emphasize your knowledge of the products or services, as well as your customer-service skills. Check help-wanted advertisements in local newspapers and shoppers, as well as on Craigslist. Look at postings on bulletin boards and in college publications. Keep in mind that sales jobs that offer commissions pay better than standard part-time, minimum-wage work. Sales positions may be in shops, on the telephone or door-to-door.

Other ideas for working in the community include paid internships, work-study programs, delivering newspapers and donating blood. Among the jobs at private homes are babysitting, dog walking, lawn mowing, snow shoveling and house painting. Some students make money by running errands, like grocery shopping, for people. An elderly resident of the community may need a driver. Create an eye-catching flyer advertising your services, and post it in prominent locations around town.

Online

Some students use their computers to earn money. Various websites offer opportunities to review products or services, and take part in focus groups or other market research. There are companies that will pay you to fill out opinion surveys, or evaluate products and services as a mystery shopper. Sites like Odesk and Elance list a range of online jobs, including article writing, web design and programming.

Back home in your old bedroom, or the attic or garage, you may have possessions with some value that you no longer want. Sell them on eBay or Craigslist. You also can make money by buying stuff at garage sales, yard sales and thrift shops that can be resold online. Sell other people’s items, too, and keep a percentage of the profit. If you are good at taking pictures, check out websites that pay for photographs. If you enjoy shooting videos, come up with an original idea for a YouTube channel to showcase your work.

You need to assess your strengths to determine the type of part-time work that is best for you. Your financial needs and college schedule also are factors. A part-time retail job is a good idea for those with strong communication and people skills, while more introverted students may prefer online work. Consider all the available options and see which ones match your interests. You just may find an enjoyable way to make money while in college.

How to manage your college budget

College is the time when you probably start earning for the first time and hence you need to be knowledgeable about finance basics to cruise through. You need to learn to juggle paying for tuition, living expenses and partying too. College is a heady time so you should try to keep your feet firmly on the ground especially with regard to spending. In this article, we offer useful tips on how to manage your college budget.

Prepare a Budget before You Start College

Make a rudimentary budget before you land on the campus. List your “income” (student loans, part-time job paychecks, help from parents) and expenses (tuition, books and living costs). Make sure the income column is more than the expenses column. A basic budget can help you stay in great financial shape through the academic year.

Get a Part-Time Job

For additional income, find yourself a suitable part-time job on or near the campus. On-campus gigs are preferable because the employer would be clued into your needs (flexible hours, extra time for studying and assignments, etc). Some jobs like minding the library or gym can actually provide you time to finish homework.

Scout for Student Discounts

Be on the lookout for student discounts offered by clothing shops, salons, travel agencies, movie theaters, bookstores and restaurants near the campus. These businesses gain by word-of-mouth publicity from benefitting students. So carry your student ID at all times and don’t be scared to flash it and ask for available discounts. This is a pleasantly surprising method to save money and enjoy yourself too.

Think Creatively

Think out of the box about ways to save money. You can buy used books or borrow them from the library, opt for less expensive meal plans and eat pizza less often to start with. Make a list of opportunities where you can scrimp and save money. Be creative and come up with options that can help you save your hard-earned moolah.

Be Careful with Your Credit Cards

Credit card companies throng campuses to offer credit cards to students without charging a fee for using them. It can be a heady feeling for a student to flaunt their credit card and buy whatever they wish. But indiscriminate buying can boomerang and you quickly rack up a huge bill in no time. So be judicious with your credit cards and pay off the due amount on time to avoid paying exorbitant interest on the unpaid balance. Use your credit cards wisely as an aid to balance your monthly budget.

Keep an Amount for Emergencies

Life can throw up unexpected surprises and it pays to be prepared for them. So keep a fixed amount handy for emergencies like car problems, medical treatment expenses, etc. Most schools offer a small amount in emergency funds that you can utilize in your hour of need. So do your homework and learn about this facility beforehand so that you can be on top of any emergency situation if it arises.

Track Your Purchases

Preserve all your bills and count your expenses at the end of the month to know exactly how much you have spent. Allot a specific amount of a few dollars for each day to spend on miscellaneous stuff like coffee, snacks, etc. Try to limit your daily spending to within this fixed amount. You can relax a bit during the weekends and spend a bit more as long as it is within your monthly budget.

Summary

A penny saved is a penny earned. So don’t be extravagant with your spending or try to impress your friends with fancy gadgets, clothes and more. If your finances are under control, you will be able to study and party with a happy mind. So err on the side of caution when it comes to spending money at college.

Personal Finance for the New Graduate

Although money management skills are important, many people have a problem handling their personal finances. This issue is even more important for new college graduates. As they leave school they will be faced with repaying student loans while dealing with other expenses like rent and healthcare. Many new graduates do not find the jobs right away, making it even more important to manage their money.

With some planning and good financial advice, the new graduate can cover bills and save money for the future. Here are some tips that can help in managing your personal finances:

Create a Budget

This is probably the most important aspect of money management. It will take a few months before you get a sense of your spending patterns and expenses if you are new to budgeting. When you look at your income and expenses, this will give you an idea of how much you can save. If you are unable to save, examining the budget can help to decided where you can cut some costs.

Never use more from your credit card than you need to, and try to clear the balance each month. This will help you to avoid additional interest. Do not go shopping for clothes if you don’t need them, and avoid eating out unless you absolutely have to. Ultimately, your main goal is to keep your spending below the level of your income. This is the only way you will be able to save.

Reduce Living Expenses

This can mean getting a roommate and sharing the rent or moving in with your parents. Either way you can save a lot of money that you can put towards savings. For some grads, their parents’ home might be the best option since they can live there rent free. It is a good idea to contribute towards expenses such as food, but the bulk of your money should be saved.

Set aside Money for Emergencies

Some people save in a special account for emergencies. This savings is not used for daily expenses or other living expenses. At any time, a crisis may arise, such as a major health problem. Putting money aside in an account that yields high interest, such as a market mutual fund is a good idea. In an emergency you can pull from these funds without putting a strain on your budget. Note that it will take some time to create this sort of fund, so it is best to start early.

Get Books and Information on Money Management

You can search the Internet for used books that cover this important topic. Some of these books actually target new college graduates, so you will find that much of the information applies to you. Do some research on the author of any book you are thinking of buying. This will help to ensure that you are getting advice from a qualified person.

The Internet has lots of information on money management that will come in useful to you now and later on in life. Learning what you can and applying some of these tips to your own life will help you become financially independent.

Avoid New Debts

Do not create any new debt unless it is for something vital. This is even more important if you have student loans to deal with. If you are struggling to get by, that is not the time to buy new furniture or a new TV, even if these items are on sale. You should also try to clear your existing debts as quickly as possible.

College students and recent grads need to be smart in the way they handle their money but they don’t have to be experts. Personal finance involves common sense decisions such as putting extra money towards their student loan. This is a smart move as it helps to clear your loan quicker.  Aside from saving money, it is wise to invest money in mutual funds and similar investment instruments. With discipline, you can end up with enough money to help clear debts or make a down payment on a house.

Part-time jobs: effective way to earn extra cash

Part-time jobs give many benefits to students. The first and most important: start earning while you’re learning. Other benefits may be:

  • Gain experience related to your field of study
  • Enhance your communication skills
  • Get hands-on experience and exposure towards practical life
  • Gain soft skills and learn how to deal with different people
  • Learn to cope in different situations
  • Develop time management skills and learn to prioritize
  • Skills obtained may be applied to coursework

The extra cash that students earn while taking up part time work enables them to manage their daily expenses. Pay for their course books, dorm fees and other cooking or eating-out expenses. It also provides with a cushion in case of emergencies. There is student loan to worry about too once you have completed your study, starting to earn while studying enhances students to save some part of it and start paying off the loan earlier than anticipated.

Although part-time jobs offer wonderful benefits, students should also keep in mind that they’re first priority is to complete their studies. Any part-time work that they do should not interfere with their studies, or lecture timings. It should also not become an obstacle in the way of completing assignments on time. If students think it is unmanageable, choose to work only on weekends or take up work in summer breaks.

Some options of part-time jobs available to students are:

Restaurant Work

Work at a nearby restaurant or local bar. It requires little or no experience and the shift timings are flexible to manage with studies.

Call Center

Call center’s offer flexible timings and the pay is also good. Working at call centers is a great way to learn how to deal clients in different situations and enhance communication skills.

Earning Online

Making money online is one of the easiest and fastest growing ways. It could also be a means to your becoming an entrepreneur. You never know you might hit the jackpot and become the next Mark Zuckerberg. Interestingly, many great ideas are born in the minds of students, usually while brainstorming with friends. Some ways to earn online are:

Start Blogging

If you have a passion or interest, start writing about it. You can sign up with Google Ad sense and earn money via the ads posted on your blogs. If it attracts considerable amount of followers, you earn by each click on the ad. If it becomes more famous, brands could approach you to utilize your traffic towards their brand by advertising on your blog.

Take Part in Surveys

There are many online sources which pay you for participating in their surveys. You can earn some money just by a filling out a few questionnaires.

Consult Your Universities Placement Center

Every university has a placement center which helps their students in obtaining part time work. To earn some serious cash, gain experience, you can consult with them and they are sure to refer to you some places. It will also be relevant to your area of study and provide with the necessary exposure.
Another means is to work in/for your university. You can apply to be an on campus student guide. Working in your university has the added advantage of staying on campus and getting consideration for your schedule.

Tutoring

Another option available to you as a student is to teach other students. Giving lessons for a subject you are exceptionally good at can earn you some cash. Teaching also polishes your conceptual and presentation skills, which are both considered a plus when you apply for work.

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